Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 119–126

Predicting long-term recovery from depression in community settings in Western Europe: evidence from ODIN

Authors

    • School of Population, Community and Behavioural SciencesUniversity of Liverpool
  • C. Shiels
    • Centre for Public Health ResearchUniversity of Salford
  • H. Page
    • School of Population, Community and Behavioural SciencesUniversity of Liverpool
  • J. L. Ayuso-Mateos
    • Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Universitario de la PrincesaAutonomous University of Madrid
    • Instituto de Salud Carlos IIICentro de Investigación en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM
  • P. Casey
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity College Dublin
  • O. S. Dalgard
    • National Institute of Public Health
  • G. Dunn
    • Health Sciences Research Group, School of Community Based MedicineUniversity of Manchester Medical School
  • V. Lehtinen
    • National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health
  • P. Salmon
    • School of Population, Community and Behavioural SciencesUniversity of Liverpool
  • M. Whitehead
    • School of Population, Community and Behavioural SciencesUniversity of Liverpool
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00127-009-0179-1

Cite this article as:
Dowrick, C., Shiels, C., Page, H. et al. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol (2011) 46: 119. doi:10.1007/s00127-009-0179-1

Abstract

Objective

To test the impact of socio-economic and psychological adversity and healthcare on long-term recovery from depression.

Method

A community sample of 347 people with depressive disorders was followed up after 9 years. Baseline socio-economic adversity, social support, healthcare use, and psychiatric history were identified. Respondents completed self-report instruments on current depressive status (Beck depression inventory) and longstanding psychosocial adversity (sexual, physical or emotional abuse). Univariate analyses tested for association between recovery and respondent characteristics.

Results

Follow-up was achieved for 182 (52%) of the sample, of whom 75 (41%) indicated recovery from depression. Psychological adversity definitely and socio-economic adversity probably were associated with lack of recovery. Baseline healthcare had no apparent impact on outcome. Rurality and support after life events were associated with recovery. History of depression was associated with non-recovery.

Conclusion

Psychological adversity is, and socio-economic adversity may be, associated with long-term non-recovery from depression in community settings.

Keywords

DepressionCommunityRecoveryAdversity predictors

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009