Diabetologia

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 107–112

The role of diabetes mellitus in the aetiology of renal cell cancer

Authors

  • P. Lindblad
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
  • W. H. Chow
    • National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  • J. Chan
    • Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  • A. Bergström
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
  • A. Wolk
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
  • G. Gridley
    • National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, Maryland, USA
  • J. K. McLaughlin
    • International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, Maryland, USA
  • O. Nyrén
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
  • H. O. Adami
    • Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
Articles

DOI: 10.1007/s001250051122

Cite this article as:
Lindblad, P., Chow, W., Chan, J. et al. Diabetologia (1999) 42: 107. doi:10.1007/s001250051122

Summary

To investigate the relation between diabetes mellitus and the risk of renal cell cancer we carried out a population-based retrospective cohort study. Patients identified in the Swedish Inpatient Register who were discharged from hospitals with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus between 1965 and 1983 formed a cohort of 153 852 patients (80 005 women and 73 847 men). The cohort members were followed up to 1989 by record linkage to three nation-wide registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed using age-specific sex-specific and period-specific incidence and mortality rates derived from the entire Swedish population. After exclusion of the first year of observation, a total of 267 incidences of renal cell cancer (ICD-7 : 180.0) occurred in diabetic patients compared with the 182.4 that had been expected. Increased risks were observed in both women (SIR = 1.7, 95 % confidence interval, CI = 1.4–2.0) and men (SIR = 1.3; 95 % CI = 1.1–1.6) throughout the duration of follow-up (1–25 years). A higher risk was seen for kidney cancer (ICD-7 : 180) mortality (SMR = 1.9; 95 % CI = 1.7–2.2, women; SMR 1.7, 95 % CI = 1.4–1.9, men). In comparison with the general population, patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of renal cell cancer. [Diabetologia (1999) 42: 107–112]

Keywords Kidney neoplasmsdiabetes mellituscohort studyrisk factorsSweden.
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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1999