Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 103, Issue 5, pp 765–773

Genome organization in dicots. II. Arabidopsis as a ’bridging species’ to resolve genome evolution events among legumes

  • J. M. Lee
  • D. Grant
  • C. Eduardo Vallejos
  • R. C. Shoemaker
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s001220100658

Cite this article as:
Lee, J., Grant, D., Vallejos, C. et al. Theor Appl Genet (2001) 103: 765. doi:10.1007/s001220100658

Abstract 

Analysis of molecular linkage groups within the soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) genome reveals many homologous regions, reflecting the ancient polyploidy of soybean. The fragmented arrangement of the duplicated regions suggests that extensive rearrangements, as well as additional duplications, have occurred since the initial polyploidization event. In this study we used comparisons between homoeologous regions in soybean, and the homologous regions in the related diploids Phaseolus vulgaris and Vigna radiata, to elucidate the evolutionary history of the three legume genomes. Our results show that there is not only conservation of large regions of the genomes but that these conserved linkage blocks are also represented twice in the soybean genome. To gain a better understanding of the process of genome evolution in dicots, molecular comparisons have been extended to another well-studied species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, the conserved regions we identified in the legume species are also relatively conserved in Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that there is conservation of blocks of DNA between species as distantly related as legumes and brassicas, representing 90 million years of divergence. We also present evidence for an additional, presumably earlier, genome duplication in soybean. These duplicated regions were only recognized by using Arabidopsis as a ’bridging’ species in the genome comparisons.

Keywords Soybean Arabidopsis Phaseolus Vigna Evolution Paleopolyploid Genome duplication 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Lee
    • 1
  • D. Grant
    • 1
  • C. Eduardo Vallejos
    • 3
  • R. C. Shoemaker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA e-mail: rcsshoe@iastate.edu Tel.: +1-515-294-6233, Fax: +1-515-294-2299, Present address: J.M. Lee, Center for Genomics and Bioinformatics, Karolinska Institutet, S17177 Stockholm, SwedenSE
  2. 2.USDA-ARS Corn Insect and Crop Genetics Research Group, Iowa State University, Ames IA 50011, USAUS
  3. 3.Horticultural Science Department and Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USAUS

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