Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 101, Issue 3, pp 457–462

Evolution of resistance against powdery mildew in winter wheat populations conducted under dynamic management. II. Adult plant resistance

  • S. Paillard
  • I. Goldringer
  • J. Enjalbert
  • M. Trottet
  • J. David
  • C. de Vallavieille-Pope
  • P. Brabant
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s001220051503

Cite this article as:
Paillard, S., Goldringer, I., Enjalbert, J. et al. Theor Appl Genet (2000) 101: 457. doi:10.1007/s001220051503

Abstract 

The evolution of adult plant resistance towards powdery mildew (caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) was investigated in 11 wheat populations cultivated for 10 years in a French network for dynamic management (DM) of wheat genetic resources. The aims of the study were to compare the evolution of resistance in sites submitted to different powdery mildew pressure and to investigate the implication of specific resistance gene action in adult plant resistance. For this, 7 of the 11 populations were characterized for their composition of specific resistance genes (results presented in a former paper). Even though no population differed significantly from the initial PA0 pool for mean adult plant resistance, divergence appeared among the final populations. The populations with the highest adult plant resistance level originated from sites where powdery mildew pressure is known to be high (Vervins, Le Rheu), whereas populations with the lowest adult plant resistance corresponded to areas with no, or very low, powdery mildew pressure (Toulouse, Montreuil-Bellay). A residual effect of defeated specific resistance genes was hypothesized, as lines accumulating at least two specific resistance genes appeared more resistant. Additional quantitative resistance seemed to be involved in adult plant resistance. DM lines appeared then as an interesting source of variability for resistance towards powdery mildew. Moreover, as these lines had been grown in mixed populations they may be appropriate as components of a composite cultivar.

Keywords Composite populationsTriticum aestivumBlumeria (Erysiphe) graminis f. sp. triticiResidual resistance effectsQuantitative resistance

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Paillard
    • 1
  • I. Goldringer
    • 1
  • J. Enjalbert
    • 1
  • M. Trottet
    • 3
  • J. David
    • 4
  • C. de Vallavieille-Pope
    • 2
  • P. Brabant
    • 1
  1. 1.INRA INA-PG UPS, Station de Génétique Végétale, Ferme du Moulon 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette, France e-mail: paillard@moulon.inra.fr Tel.: +33 (0)1 69 33 23 76, Fax: +33 (0) 1 69 33 23 40FR
  2. 2.INRA, Unité de Pathologie, Végétale, INRA, BP01, F78850 Thiverval-Grignon, FranceFR
  3. 3.INRA, Station d’Amélioration des Plantes, B.P. 29-35653 Le Rheu Cedex, FranceFR
  4. 4.ENSAM INRA, UFR de Génétique et Amélioration des Plantes, Domaine de Melgueil, 34130 Mauguio, FranceFR
  5. 5.Institut National Agronomique Paris-Grignon, 16, rue Claude Bernard, 75005 Paris, FranceFR