Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 97, Issue 3, pp 370–380

Integrated map of AFLP, SSLP and RFLP markers using a recombinant inbred population of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

  • Y. G. Cho
  • S. R. McCouch
  • M. Kuiper
  • M.-R. Kang
  • J. Pot
  • J. T. M. Groenen
  • M. Y. Eun

DOI: 10.1007/s001220050907

Cite this article as:
Cho, Y., McCouch, S., Kuiper, M. et al. Theor Appl Genet (1998) 97: 370. doi:10.1007/s001220050907

Abstract

 A molecular map of rice consisting of 231 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), 212 restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), 86 simple-sequence length polymorphisms (SSLPs), five isozyme loci, and two morphological mutant loci [phenol staining of grain (Ph), semi-dwarf habit (sd-1)] has been constructed using an F11 recombinant inbred (RI) population. The mapping population consisted of 164 RI lines and was developed via single-seed descent from an intercross between the genetically divergent parents Milyang 23 (M) (tongil type) and Gihobyeo (G) ( japonica type). A subset of previously mapped RFLP and SSLP markers were used to construct the map framework. The AFLP markers were derived from ten EcoRI(+2) and MseI(+3) primer combinations. All marker types were well distributed throughout the 12 chromosomes. The integrated map covered 1814 cM, with an average interval size of 3.4 cM. The MG map is a cornerstone of the Korean Rice Genome Research Program (KRGRP) and is being continuously refined through the addition of partially sequenced cDNA markers derived from an immature-seed cDNA library developed in Korea, and microsatellite markers developed at Cornell. The population is also being used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and as the basis for marker-assisted variety development.

Key words Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)Simple-sequence length polymorphism (SSLP)Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)Rice (Oryza sativa L.)Molecular map

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. G. Cho
    • 2
  • S. R. McCouch
    • 1
  • M. Kuiper
    • 4
  • M.-R. Kang
    • 3
  • J. Pot
    • 4
  • J. T. M. Groenen
    • 4
  • M. Y. Eun
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Plant Breeding, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1901, USA Fax: 607-255-6683 E-mail: srm4@cornell.eduUS
  2. 2.Department of Agronomy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 361-763, Korea Fax: 82-431-273-2242 E-mail: ygcho@cbucc.chungbuk.ac.krKR
  3. 3.National Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology, Suwon 441-707, KoreaKR
  4. 4.KeyGene N.V., Agro Business Park 90, 6708 PW Wageningen, The NetherlandsNL