Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 122, Issue 7, pp 1339–1349

Quantitative trait loci analysis for resistance to Cephalosporium stripe, a vascular wilt disease of wheat

  • Martin C. Quincke
  • C. James Peterson
  • Robert S. Zemetra
  • Jennifer L. Hansen
  • Jianli Chen
  • Oscar Riera-Lizarazu
  • Christopher C. Mundt
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00122-011-1535-6

Cite this article as:
Quincke, M.C., Peterson, C.J., Zemetra, R.S. et al. Theor Appl Genet (2011) 122: 1339. doi:10.1007/s00122-011-1535-6

Abstract

Cephalosporium stripe, caused by Cephalosporium gramineum, can cause severe loss of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) yield and grain quality and can be an important factor limiting adoption of conservation tillage practices. Selecting for resistance to Cephalosporium stripe is problematic; however, as optimum conditions for disease do not occur annually under natural conditions, inoculum levels can be spatially heterogeneous, and little is known about the inheritance of resistance. A population of 268 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between two wheat cultivars was characterized using field screening and molecular markers to investigate the inheritance of resistance to Cephalosporium stripe. Whiteheads (sterile heads caused by pathogen infection) were measured on each RIL in three field environments under artificially inoculated conditions. A linkage map for this population was created based on 204 SSR and DArT markers. A total of 36 linkage groups were resolved, representing portions of all chromosomes except for chromosome 1D, which lacked a sufficient number of polymorphic markers. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified seven regions associated with resistance to Cephalosporium stripe, with approximately equal additive effects. Four QTL derived from the more susceptible parent (Brundage) and three came from the more resistant parent (Coda), but the cumulative, additive effect of QTL from Coda was greater than that of Brundage. Additivity of QTL effects was confirmed through regression analysis and demonstrates the advantage of accumulating multiple QTL alleles to achieve high levels of resistance.

Supplementary material

122_2011_1535_MOESM1_ESM.doc (132 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 132 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin C. Quincke
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. James Peterson
    • 1
    • 3
  • Robert S. Zemetra
    • 5
  • Jennifer L. Hansen
    • 6
  • Jianli Chen
    • 7
  • Oscar Riera-Lizarazu
    • 1
    • 4
  • Christopher C. Mundt
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Crop and Soil ScienceOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  2. 2.INIA La EstanzuelaColoniaUruguay
  3. 3.Limagrain Cereals SeedsFort CollinsUSA
  4. 4.ICRISATPatancheruIndia
  5. 5.Department of Plant, Soil, and Entomological SciencesUniversity of IdahoMoscowUSA
  6. 6.Department of Crop and Soil ScienceWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  7. 7.Department of Plant, Soil and Entomological SciencesUniversity of Idaho Aberdeen Research and Extension CenterAberdeenUSA
  8. 8.Department of Botany and Plant PathologyOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA