Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 118, Issue 8, pp 1617–1631

Family-based mapping of quantitative trait loci in plant breeding populations with resistance to Fusarium head blight in wheat as an illustration

  • U. R. Rosyara
  • J. L. Gonzalez-Hernandez
  • K. D. Glover
  • K. R. Gedye
  • J. M. Stein
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00122-009-1010-9

Cite this article as:
Rosyara, U.R., Gonzalez-Hernandez, J.L., Glover, K.D. et al. Theor Appl Genet (2009) 118: 1617. doi:10.1007/s00122-009-1010-9

Abstract

Traditional quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping approaches are typically based on early or advanced generation analysis of bi-parental populations. A limitation associated with this methodology is the fact that mapping populations rarely give rise to new cultivars. Additionally, markers linked to the QTL of interest are often not immediately available for use in breeding and they may not be useful within diverse genetic backgrounds. Use of breeding populations for simultaneous QTL mapping, marker validation, marker assisted selection (MAS), and cultivar release has recently caught the attention of plant breeders to circumvent the weaknesses of conventional QTL mapping. The first objective of this study was to test the feasibility of using family-pedigree based QTL mapping techniques generally used with humans and animals within plant breeding populations (PBPs). The second objective was to evaluate two methods (linkage and association) to detect marker-QTL associations. The techniques described in this study were applied to map the well characterized QTL, Fhb1 for Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat (Triticumaestivum L.). The experimental populations consisted of 82 families and 793 individuals. The QTL was mapped using both linkage (variance component and pedigree-wide regression) and association (using quantitative transmission disequilibrium test, QTDT) approaches developed for extended family-pedigrees. Each approach successfully identified the known QTL location with a high probability value. Markers linked to the QTL explained 40–50% of the phenotypic variation. These results show the usefulness of a human genetics approach to detect QTL in PBPs and subsequent use in MAS.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. R. Rosyara
    • 1
  • J. L. Gonzalez-Hernandez
    • 1
  • K. D. Glover
    • 1
  • K. R. Gedye
    • 1
  • J. M. Stein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant SciencesSouth Dakota State UniversityBrookingsUSA

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