Theoretical and Applied Genetics

, Volume 118, Issue 3, pp 413–421

Fine mapping of loci involved with glucosinolate biosynthesis in oilseed mustard (Brassica juncea) using genomic information from allied species

Authors

  • N. C. Bisht
    • Centre for Genetic Manipulation of Crop PlantsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
    • National Institute of Plant Genome ResearchJNU Campus
  • V. Gupta
    • Centre for Genetic Manipulation of Crop PlantsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
  • N. Ramchiary
    • Department of GeneticsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
    • Department of HorticultureChungnam National Universiy
  • Y. S. Sodhi
    • Centre for Genetic Manipulation of Crop PlantsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
  • A. Mukhopadhyay
    • Centre for Genetic Manipulation of Crop PlantsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
  • N. Arumugam
    • Centre for Genetic Manipulation of Crop PlantsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
    • Department of BiotechnologyPondicherry University
  • D. Pental
    • Centre for Genetic Manipulation of Crop PlantsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
    • Department of GeneticsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
    • Centre for Genetic Manipulation of Crop PlantsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
    • Department of GeneticsUniversity of Delhi South Campus
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00122-008-0907-z

Cite this article as:
Bisht, N.C., Gupta, V., Ramchiary, N. et al. Theor Appl Genet (2009) 118: 413. doi:10.1007/s00122-008-0907-z

Abstract

Fine mapping of six seed glucosinolate QTL (J2Gsl1, J3Gsl2, J9Gsl3, J16Gsl4, J17Gsl5 and J3Gsl6) (Ramchiary et al. in Theor Appl Genet 116:77–85, 2007a) was undertaken by the candidate gene approach. Based on the DNA sequences from Arabidopsis and Brassica oleracea for the different genes involved in the aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, candidate genes were amplified and sequenced from high to low glucosinolate Brassica juncea lines Varuna and Heera, respectively. Of the 20 paralogues identified, 17 paralogues belonging to six gene families were mapped to 12 of the 18 linkage groups of B. juncea genome. Co-mapping of candidate genes with glucosinolate QTL revealed that the candidate gene BjuA.GSL-ELONG.a mapped to the QTL interval of J2Gsl1, BjuA.GSL-ELONG.c, BjuA.GSL-ELONG.d and BjuA.Myb28.a mapped to the QTL interval of J3Gsl2, BjuA.GSL-ALK.a mapped to the QTL interval of J3Gsl6 and BjuB.Myb28.a mapped to the QTL interval of J17Gsl5. The QTL J9Gsl3 and J16Gsl4 did not correspond to any of the mapped candidate genes. The functionality and contribution of different candidate genes/QTL was assessed by allelic variation study using phenotypic data of 785 BC4DH lines. It was observed that BjuA.Myb28.a and J9Gsl3 contributed significantly to the base level glucosinolate production while J16Gsl4, probably GSL-PRO, BjuA.GSL-ELONG.a and BjuA.GSL-ELONG.c contributed to the C3, C4 and C5 elongation pathways, respectively. Three A genome QTL: J2Gsl1harbouring BjuA.GSL-ELONG.a, J3Gsl2 harbouring both BjuA.GSL-ELONG.c and BjuA.Myb28.a and J9Gsl3, possibly the ‘Bronowski genes’, were identified as most important loci for breeding low glucosinolate B. juncea. We observed two-step genetic control of seed glucosinolate in B. juncea mainly effected by these three A genome QTL. This study, therefore, provides clues to the genetic mechanism of ‘Bronowski genes’ controlling the glucosinolate trait and also provides efficient markers for marker-assisted introgression of low glucosinolate trait in B. juncea.

Supplementary material

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Figure 1S (PPT 60 kb)
122_2008_907_MOESM2_ESM.doc (68 kb)
Table 1S (DOC 68 kb)
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Table 2S (DOC 180 kb)
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Table 3S (DOC 43 kb)
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Table 4S (DOC 47 kb)
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Table 5S (DOC 59 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008