Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 87, Issue 11, pp 491–493

Garden sharing and garden stealing in fungus-growing ants

Authors

  • Rachelle M. M. Adams
    • Section of Integrative Biology, Patterson Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA e-mail: umueller@mail.utexas.edu
  • U. G. Mueller
    • Section of Integrative Biology, Patterson Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA e-mail: umueller@mail.utexas.edu
  • Alisha K. Holloway
    • Section of Integrative Biology, Patterson Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA e-mail: umueller@mail.utexas.edu
  • Abigail M. Green
    • Section of Integrative Biology, Patterson Laboratories, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA e-mail: umueller@mail.utexas.edu
  • Joanie Narozniak
    • Department of Biology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
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DOI: 10.1007/s001140050765

Cite this article as:
Adams, R., Mueller, U., Holloway, A. et al. Naturwissenschaften (2000) 87: 491. doi:10.1007/s001140050765

Abstract

 Fungi cultivated by fungus-growing ants (Attini: Formicidae) are passed on between generations by transfer from maternal to offspring nest (vertical transmission within ant species). However, recent phylogenetic analyses revealed that cultivars are occasionally also transferred between attine species. The reasons for such lateral cultivar transfers are unknown. To investigate whether garden loss may induce ants to obtain a replacement cultivar from a neighboring colony (lateral cultivar transfer), pairs of queenright colonies of two Cyphomyrmex species were set up in two conjoined chambers; the garden of one colony was then removed to simulate the total crop loss that occurs naturally when pathogens devastate gardens. Garden-deprived colonies regained cultivars through one of three mechanisms: joining of a neighboring colony and cooperation in a common garden; stealing of a neighbor's garden; or aggressive usurpation of a neighbor's garden. Because pathogens frequently devastate attine gardens under natural conditions, garden joining, stealing and usurpation emerge as critical behavioral adaptations to survive garden catastrophes.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000