Naturwissenschaften

, Volume 95, Issue 7, pp 647–654

Do native brown trout and non-native brook trout interact reproductively?

Authors

    • EcoLab, Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle, UMR 5245 (CNRS-UPS-INPT)Université Paul Sabatier
  • J. C. Aymes
    • EcoLab, Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle, UMR 5245 (CNRS-UPS-INPT)Université Paul Sabatier
    • UMR EcobiopINRA
  • N. Poulet
    • ONEMA, Office national de l’eau et des milieux aquatiques
  • F. Santoul
    • EcoLab, Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle, UMR 5245 (CNRS-UPS-INPT)Université Paul Sabatier
  • R. Céréghino
    • EcoLab, Laboratoire d’écologie fonctionnelle, UMR 5245 (CNRS-UPS-INPT)Université Paul Sabatier
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00114-008-0370-3

Cite this article as:
Cucherousset, J., Aymes, J.C., Poulet, N. et al. Naturwissenschaften (2008) 95: 647. doi:10.1007/s00114-008-0370-3

Abstract

Reproductive interactions between native and non-native species of fish have received little attention compared to other types of interactions such as predation or competition for food and habitat. We studied the reproductive interactions between non-native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and native brown trout (Salmo trutta) in a Pyrenees Mountain stream (SW France). We found evidence of significant interspecific interactions owing to consistent spatial and temporal overlap in redd localizations and spawning periods. We observed mixed spawning groups composed of the two species, interspecific subordinate males, and presence of natural hybrids (tiger trout). These reproductive interactions could be detrimental to the reproduction success of both species. Our study shows that non-native species might have detrimental effects on native species via subtle hybridization behavior.

Keywords

Introduced speciesSalmonidsSalmo truttaSalvelinus fontinalisHybridization behaviorTiger trout

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008