Naturwissenschaften

, 94:575

The oldest African fox (Vulpes riffautae n. sp., Canidae, Carnivora) recovered in late Miocene deposits of the Djurab desert, Chad

Authors

    • Laboratoire de Géobiologie, Biochronologie et Paléontologie humaine, UMR 6046 CNRSUniversité de Poitiers
  • Stéphane Peigné
    • Laboratoire de Géobiologie, Biochronologie et Paléontologie humaine, UMR 6046 CNRSUniversité de Poitiers
  • Andossa Likius
    • Université de N’Djamena
  • Hassane Taïsso Mackaye
    • Université de N’Djamena
  • Patrick Vignaud
    • Laboratoire de Géobiologie, Biochronologie et Paléontologie humaine, UMR 6046 CNRSUniversité de Poitiers
  • Michel Brunet
    • Laboratoire de Géobiologie, Biochronologie et Paléontologie humaine, UMR 6046 CNRSUniversité de Poitiers
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s00114-007-0230-6

Cite this article as:
de Bonis, L., Peigné, S., Likius, A. et al. Naturwissenschaften (2007) 94: 575. doi:10.1007/s00114-007-0230-6

Abstract

We report on the oldest fox (Canidae) ever found in Africa. It is dated to 7 Ma based on the degree of evolution of the whole fauna. It belongs to a new species. Its overall size and some morphological characteristics distinguish the Chadian specimen from all the other foxes. The presence of Vulpes and of the genus Eucyon in slightly younger African locality, as well as in southwestern Europe in the late Miocene, may indicate that canids migrated in Europe from Africa through a trans-Mediterranean route.

Keywords

MammaliaCarnivoraCanidaeAfricaLate Miocene

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007