, Volume 91, Issue 2, pp 157-164
Date: 08 Jan 2013

Adenosine and gastrointestinal inflammation

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Abstract

Nucleosides such as adenosine (Ado) influence nearly every aspect of physiology and pathophysiology. Extracellular nucleotides liberated at local sites of inflammation are metabolized through regulated phosphohydrolysis by a series of ecto-nucleotidases including ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (CD39) and ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73), found on the surface of a variety of cell types. Once generated, Ado is made available to bind and activate one of four G protein-coupled Ado receptors. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies implicate Ado in a broad array of tissue-protective mechanisms that provide new insight into adenosine actions. Studies in cultured cells and murine tissues have indicated that Ado receptors couple to novel posttranslational protein modifications, including Cullin deneddylation, as a new anti-inflammatory mechanism. Studies in Ado receptor-null mice have been revealing and indicate a particularly important role for the Ado A2B receptor in animal models of intestinal inflammation. Here, we review contributions of Ado to cell and tissue stress responses, with a particular emphasis on the gastrointestinal mucosa.