Journal of Molecular Medicine

, Volume 80, Issue 1, pp 5–15

Prostaglandins as inflammatory messengers across the blood-brain barrier

  • David Engblom
  • Monica Ek
  • Sipra Saha
  • Anders Ericsson-Dahlstrand
  • Per-Johan Jakobsson
  • Anders Blomqvist
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00109-001-0289-z

Cite this article as:
Engblom, D., Ek, M., Saha, S. et al. J Mol Med (2002) 80: 5. doi:10.1007/s00109-001-0289-z
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Abstract.

Upon immune challenge the brain launches a wide range of responses, such as fever, anorexia, and hyperalgesia that serve to maintain homeostasis. While these responses are adaptive during acute infections, they may be destructive during chronic inflammatory conditions. Research performed during the last decade has given us insight into how the brain monitors the presence of a peripheral inflammation and the mechanisms underlying the brain-mediated acute-phase reactions. Here we give a brief review on this subject, with focus on the role of prostaglandin E2 produced in cells associated with the blood-brain barrier in immune-to-brain signaling. The recent advances in this field have not only elucidated the mechanisms behind the anti-pyretic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, but have also identified novel and more-selective potential drug targets.

Prostaglandin E synthase Cyclooxygenase 2 Interleukin-1 Prostaglandin E2 Central nervous system

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Engblom
    • 1
  • Monica Ek
    • 2
  • Sipra Saha
    • 3
  • Anders Ericsson-Dahlstrand
    • 4
  • Per-Johan Jakobsson
    • 5
  • Anders Blomqvist
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Cell Biology, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, 581 85 LinköpingSweden
  2. 2.Department of Medicine, Unit of Rheumatology, The Karolinska Institute, 171 76 StockholmSweden
  3. 3.Center for Structural Biochemistry, The Karolinska Institute, 141 57 HuddingeSweden
  4. 4.AstraZeneca R and D – Södertälje, Molecular Sciences, Novum, 141 52, HuddingeSweden
  5. 5.Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, The Karolinska Institute, 171 77 StockholmSweden