Insectes Sociaux

, 58:431

An emerging paradigm of colony health: microbial balance of the honey bee and hive (Apis mellifera)

  • K. E. Anderson
  • T. H. Sheehan
  • B. J. Eckholm
  • B. M. Mott
  • G. DeGrandi-Hoffman
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00040-011-0194-6

Cite this article as:
Anderson, K.E., Sheehan, T.H., Eckholm, B.J. et al. Insect. Soc. (2011) 58: 431. doi:10.1007/s00040-011-0194-6

Abstract

Across the globe, honey bee populations have been declining at an unprecedented rate. Managed honey bees are highly social, frequent a multitude of environmental niches, and continually share food, conditions that promote the transmission of parasites and pathogens. Additionally, commercial honey bees used in agriculture are stressed by crowding and frequent transport, and exposed to a plethora of agricultural chemicals and their associated byproducts. When considering this problem, the hive of the honey bee may be best characterized as an extended organism that not only houses developing young and nutrient rich food stores, but also serves as a niche for symbiotic microbial communities that aid in nutrition and defend against pathogens. The niche requirements and maintenance of beneficial honey bee symbionts are largely unknown, as are the ways in which such communities contribute to honey bee nutrition, immunity, and overall health. In this review, we argue that the honey bee should be viewed as a model system to examine the effect of microbial communities on host nutrition and pathogen defense. A systems view focused on the interaction of the honey bee with its associated microbial community is needed to understand the growing agricultural challenges faced by this economically important organism. The road to sustainable honey bee pollination may eventually require the detoxification of agricultural systems, and in the short term, the integrated management of honey bee microbial systems.

Keywords

Symbiosis Extended organism Social insects Microbial ecology Pathogen defense 

Copyright information

© International Union for the Study of Social Insects (IUSSI) (outside the USA) 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. E. Anderson
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. H. Sheehan
    • 2
  • B. J. Eckholm
    • 2
  • B. M. Mott
    • 1
  • G. DeGrandi-Hoffman
    • 1
  1. 1.Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, USDA-ARSTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Department of EntomologyUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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