Short-term effects of fine particulate matter pollution on daily health events in Latin America: a systematic review and meta-analysis

  • Laís Fajersztajn
  • Paulo Saldiva
  • Luiz Alberto Amador Pereira
  • Victor Figueiredo Leite
  • Anna Maria Buehler
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00038-017-0960-y

Cite this article as:
Fajersztajn, L., Saldiva, P., Pereira, L.A.A. et al. Int J Public Health (2017). doi:10.1007/s00038-017-0960-y

Abstract

Objectives

Ambient air pollution is among the leading risks for health worldwide and by 2050 will largely overcome deaths due to unsafe sanitation and malaria, but local evidence from Latin America (LA) is scarce. We aimed to summarize the effect of short-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution (PM2.5) on morbidity and mortality in Latin America and evaluate evidence coverage and quality, using systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods

The comprehensive search (six online databases and hand-searching) identified studies investigating the short-term associations between PM2.5 and daily health events in LA. Two reviewers independently accessed the internal validity of the studies and used random-effect models in the meta-analysis.

Results

We retrieved 1628 studies. Nine were elected for the qualitative analysis and seven for the quantitative analyses. Each 10 µg/m3 increments in daily PM2.5 concentrations was significantly associated with increased risk for respiratory and cardiovascular mortality in all-ages (polled RR = 1.02, 95% CI, 1.02–1.02 and RR = 1.01, 95% CI , 1.01–1.02, respectively).

Conclusions

Short-term exposure to PM2.5 in LA is significantly associated with increased risk for respiratory and cardiovascular mortality. Evidence is concentrated in few cities and some presented high risk of bias.

Keywords

Air pollution Particulate matter Fine particulate matter PM2.5 Mortality Latin America Systematic review and meta-analysis 

Supplementary material

38_2017_960_MOESM1_ESM.docx (316 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 315 KB)

Copyright information

© Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laís Fajersztajn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Paulo Saldiva
    • 1
    • 2
  • Luiz Alberto Amador Pereira
    • 3
  • Victor Figueiredo Leite
    • 4
  • Anna Maria Buehler
    • 5
  1. 1.Laboratory of Experimental Air Pollution (LIM05), Department of Pathology, School of MedicineUniversity of São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  2. 2.Institute for Advanced Studies of the University of São Paulo-IEASão PauloBrazil
  3. 3.Collective Health Pos-Graduation ProgramCatholic University of SantosSantosBrazil
  4. 4.Institute of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationUniversity of São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  5. 5.Health Technology Assessment Unit, Institute of Health Education and ScienceGerman Hospital Oswaldo CruzSão PauloBrazil

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