International Journal of Public Health

, Volume 59, Issue 3, pp 493–502

Exploring subgroup effects by socioeconomic position of three effective school-based dietary interventions: the European TEENAGE project

  • Nanna Lien
  • Leen Haerens
  • Saskia J. te Velde
  • Liesbeth Mercken
  • Knut-Inge Klepp
  • Laurence Moore
  • Ilse de Bourdeaudhuij
  • Fabrizio Faggiano
  • Frank J. van Lenthe
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00038-013-0524-8

Cite this article as:
Lien, N., Haerens, L., te Velde, S.J. et al. Int J Public Health (2014) 59: 493. doi:10.1007/s00038-013-0524-8

Abstract

Objectives

The aim of this study was to explore subgroup effects by high and low socioeconomic position (SEP) of three previously conducted, effective European interventions.

Methods

Reanalyses stratified by SEP were conducted by the research groups of each study. All studies were school-based: two multi-component interventions targeting intake of fat or fruit and vegetables (FV), and a free breakfast initiative.

Results

Computer-tailored advice affected fat intake among low, but not high SEP girls after 1 year. A multi-component intervention affected the total FV intake in both SEP groups, vegetable intake in low SEP and fruit intake in high SEP across three countries after 1 year, whereas free fruit affected total FV and fruit intake equally in both SEP groups in one country after 2 years. Providing a free healthy breakfast increased consumption of healthy food items only in the low SEP group.

Conclusions

Reanalysing intervention studies by SEP is a quick and easy way to explore patterns in effects by SEP across interventions. Providing healthy food might be a promising strategy for decreasing social inequalities.

Keywords

Diet Adolescence Socioeconomic position Intervention School 

Copyright information

© Swiss School of Public Health 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nanna Lien
    • 1
  • Leen Haerens
    • 2
  • Saskia J. te Velde
    • 3
  • Liesbeth Mercken
    • 4
    • 5
  • Knut-Inge Klepp
    • 1
  • Laurence Moore
    • 5
  • Ilse de Bourdeaudhuij
    • 2
  • Fabrizio Faggiano
    • 6
  • Frank J. van Lenthe
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Nutrition, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  2. 2.Department of Movement and Sport SciencesGhent UniversityGhentBelgium
  3. 3.EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research and the Department of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsVU University Medical CentreAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  4. 4.Department of Health PromotionMaastricht UniversityMaastrichtThe Netherlands
  5. 5.DECIPHer, Cardiff School of Social SciencesCardiff UniversityCardiffUK
  6. 6.Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineAvogadro UniversityNovaraItaly
  7. 7.Department of Public HealthErasmus Medical CenterRotterdamThe Netherlands

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