International Journal of Public Health

, Volume 57, Issue 1, pp 143–148

Fathers’ intentions to accept human papillomavirus vaccination for sons and daughters: exploratory findings from rural Honduras

  • Rebecca B. Perkins
  • Pooja K. Mehta
  • Sarah M. Langrish
Original article

DOI: 10.1007/s00038-011-0271-7

Cite this article as:
Perkins, R.B., Mehta, P.K. & Langrish, S.M. Int J Public Health (2012) 57: 143. doi:10.1007/s00038-011-0271-7

Abstract

Objectives

Little is known about fathers’ attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in low-resource settings. We sought to determine the awareness of HPV vaccination among Honduran fathers, and to assess their intention to accept HPV vaccination for their sons and daughters.

Methods

We conducted 100 structured interviews of fathers recruited from medical and business settings between May 2007 and June 2008. After assessing baseline knowledge, fathers received a brief explanation of HPV infection, cervical cancer, genital warts, and HPV vaccination. They were then asked whether they would accept HPV vaccination for their sons and daughters.

Results

Prior to receiving information about HPV, 85% of fathers believed that cervical cancer was preventable, over two-thirds could correctly name some form of prevention, 22% of fathers had heard of HPV, and 17% had heard of HPV vaccination. After receiving HPV-related information, 100% of fathers intended to accept HPV vaccination for their sons and 94% intended to accept HPV vaccination for their daughters.

Conclusions

Few Honduran fathers were aware of HPV or HPV vaccination, but after receiving information, most would accept HPV vaccination for their sons and daughters.

Keywords

HPV vaccination Fathers Parental acceptance Low-resource settings 

Copyright information

© Swiss School of Public Health 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rebecca B. Perkins
    • 1
  • Pooja K. Mehta
    • 1
  • Sarah M. Langrish
    • 2
  1. 1.BostonUSA
  2. 2.TegucigalpaUSA

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