International Journal of Public Health

, Volume 55, Issue 5, pp 401–411

The self-reported health of legal and illegal/irregular immigrants in the Czech Republic

Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00038-010-0156-1

Cite this article as:
Pikhart, H., Drbohlav, D. & Dzurova, D. Int J Public Health (2010) 55: 401. doi:10.1007/s00038-010-0156-1

Abstract

Objectives

To test whether immigrants with illegal/irregular status have higher odds of poor self-rated health (SRH) than immigrants with legal status, and whether different demographic, socioeconomic and psychosocial factors affect SRH among legal and illegal/irregular immigrants.

Methods

Analysis is based on data from two questionnaire surveys of 285 Post-Soviet and Vietnamese immigrants (126 legal and 159 illegal/irregular) living and working in the Czech Republic, which were conducted between 2003 and 2006. The risk of poor SRH was estimated by ordered polytomous regression, the dependent variable was SRH, and selected demographic, socioeconomic and psychosocial characteristics entered the analysis as explanatory variables.

Results

Odds of poor SRH among illegal immigrants were not statistically significantly higher than among legal migrants in fully adjusted analysis. Females and older immigrants had poorer SRH. Satisfaction with work, and, partly, with housing were found to have a significant role. Educational level and ‘social communication’ variables did not have an important role in predicting SRH.

Conclusions

Inequalities in SRH among legal and illegal immigrants were largely explained by socioeconomic and psychosocial factors in this study. These results should stimulate further research activities that might improve health policy and planning related to immigrants’ health in this and other countries in Europe.

Keywords

Self-rated healthIllegal/irregular and legal immigrantsPost-SovietsVietnameseCzech Republic

Copyright information

© Swiss School of Public Health 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University College London, International Institute for Society and HealthLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Social Geography and Regional Development, Faculty of ScienceCharles University in PraguePrague 2Czech Republic