Aquatic Sciences

, Volume 73, Issue 2, pp 185–200

Managing invasive crayfish: is there a hope?

  • Francesca Gherardi
  • Laura Aquiloni
  • Javier Diéguez-Uribeondo
  • Elena Tricarico
Overview

DOI: 10.1007/s00027-011-0181-z

Cite this article as:
Gherardi, F., Aquiloni, L., Diéguez-Uribeondo, J. et al. Aquat Sci (2011) 73: 185. doi:10.1007/s00027-011-0181-z

Abstract

Given that the impact exerted by non-indigenous crayfish species (NICS) is most often severe, can occur across many levels of ecological organization, and results in the loss of native crayfish populations, the Convention on Biological Diversity approach, as complemented by the European Strategy, is viewed as an excellent framework to be followed to prevent the introduction of NICS and to alleviate or eliminate the damage they inflict. Much effort should be directed to minimize the risks of intentional introductions, as in part done by the Council Regulation No. 708/07 in force in the European Union since 2009. However, this and other regulations are not well harmonized, for instance, with those concerning both the aquarium trade and the harvest of crayfish for human consumption. To make prevention more difficult, there are many records of illegal release of NICS into the wild and of their accidental introduction as undetected contaminants in batches of regulated fish species. As a consequence, it seems necessary that post-introduction mitigation and remediation protocols and processes, such as contingency plans, are always in place to enable rapid detection and early response in order to minimize and, ideally, annul the threats posed by NICS. The aim of this review paper is to offer a synthetic view of the different methods (mechanical removal, physical methods, biological control, biocides, and autocidal methods) proposed and adopted until now to control NICS with a discussion of their pitfalls and potentialities. A glimpse to the ongoing research in the matter will be also given.

Keywords

Invasive non-indigenous crayfishTrappingBiological controlBiocidesSex pheromonesSMRT

Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesca Gherardi
    • 1
  • Laura Aquiloni
    • 1
  • Javier Diéguez-Uribeondo
    • 2
  • Elena Tricarico
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica “Leo Pardi”Università degli Studi di FirenzeFlorenceItaly
  2. 2.Departamento de MicologíaReal Jardín Botánico CSICMadridSpain