pure and applied geophysics

, Volume 156, Issue 1, pp 97–122

Seismic Velocities and Anisotropy of the Lower Continental Crust: A Review

Authors

  • T. Weiss
    • Institut für Geologie und Dynamik der Lithosphäre, Goldschmidtstr. 3, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany.
  • S. Siegesmund
    • Institut für Geologie und Dynamik der Lithosphäre, Goldschmidtstr. 3, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany.
  • W. Rabbel
    • Institut für Geowissenschaften, Abteilung Geophysik, Olshausenstr. 40-60, D-24098 Kiel, Germany.
  • T. Bohlen
    • Institut für Geowissenschaften, Abteilung Geophysik, Olshausenstr. 40-60, D-24098 Kiel, Germany.
  • M. Pohl
    • Geophysikalisches Institut, Hertzstr. 16, D-76187 Karlsruhe, Germany.
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s000240050291

Cite this article as:
Weiss, T., Siegesmund, S., Rabbel, W. et al. Pure appl. geophys. (1999) 156: 97. doi:10.1007/s000240050291

Abstract

—Seismic anisotropy is often neglected in seismic studies of the earth’s crust. Since anisotropy is a common property of many typically deep crustal rocks, its potential contribution to solving questions of the deep crust is evaluated. The anisotropic seismic velocities obtained from laboratory measurements can be verified by computations based on the elastic constants and on numerical data pertaining to the texture of rock-forming minerals. For typical lower crustal rocks the influence of layering is significantly less important than the influence of rock texture. Surprisingly, most natural lower crustal rocks show a hexagonal type of anisotropy. Maximum anisotropy is observed for rocks with a high content of aligned mica. It seems possible to distinguish between layered intrusives and metasediments on the basis of in situ measurements of anisotropy, which can thus be used to validate different scenarios of crustal evolution.

Key Words: Seismic anisotropy, lower crust, shear-waves, Poisson’s ratio.

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser-Verlag Basel, 1999