Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors and schizophrenia

  • José L. Moreno
  • Stuart C. Sealfon
  • Javier González-Maeso
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00018-009-0130-3

Cite this article as:
Moreno, J.L., Sealfon, S.C. & González-Maeso, J. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2009) 66: 3777. doi:10.1007/s00018-009-0130-3

Abstract

Schizophrenia is one of the most common mental illnesses, with hereditary and environmental factors important for its etiology. All antipsychotics have in common a high affinity for monoaminergic receptors. Whereas hallucinations and delusions usually respond to typical (haloperidol-like) and atypical (clozapine-like) monoaminergic antipsychotics, their efficacy in improving negative symptoms and cognitive deficits remains inadequate. In addition, devastating side effects are a common characteristic of monoaminergic antipsychotics. Recent biochemical, preclinical and clinical findings support group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2 and mGluR3) as a new approach to treat schizophrenia. This paper reviews the status of general knowledge of mGluR2 and mGluR3 in the psychopharmacology, genetics and neuropathology of schizophrenia

Keywords

Schizophrenia Antipsychotics G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) Serotonin receptors 5-HT2A Metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR2 mGluR3 

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel/Switzerland 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • José L. Moreno
    • 1
    • 3
  • Stuart C. Sealfon
    • 2
    • 4
  • Javier González-Maeso
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Division of Basic NeuroscienceMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Center for Translational Systems BiologyMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA