The fungal glutathione S-transferase system. Evidence of new classes in the wood-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

  • Mélanie Morel
  • Andrew A. Ngadin
  • Michel Droux
  • Jean-Pierre Jacquot
  • Eric Gelhaye
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00018-009-0104-5

Cite this article as:
Morel, M., Ngadin, A.A., Droux, M. et al. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2009) 66: 3711. doi:10.1007/s00018-009-0104-5

Abstract

The recent release of several basidiomycete genome sequences allows an improvement of the classification of fungal glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). GSTs are well-known detoxification enzymes which can catalyze the conjugation of glutathione to non-polar compounds that contain an electrophilic carbon, nitrogen, or sulfur atom. Following this mechanism, they are able to metabolize drugs, pesticides, and many other xenobiotics and peroxides. A genomic and phylogenetic analysis of GST classes in various sequenced fungi—zygomycetes, ascomycetes, and basidiomycetes—revealed some particularities in GST distribution, in comparison with previous analyses with ascomycetes only. By focusing essentially on the wood-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, this analysis highlighted a new fungal GST class named GTE, which is related to bacterial etherases, and two new subclasses of the omega class GSTs. Moreover, our phylogenetic analysis suggests a relationship between the saprophytic behavior of some fungi and the number and distribution of some GST isoforms within specific classes.

Keywords

Phanerochaete chrysosporium Glutathione S-transferase Etherase Omega class GST Ure2p GTT 

Supplementary material

18_2009_104_MOESM1_ESM.doc (40 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 40 kb)

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel/Switzerland 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mélanie Morel
    • 1
  • Andrew A. Ngadin
    • 1
  • Michel Droux
    • 2
  • Jean-Pierre Jacquot
    • 1
  • Eric Gelhaye
    • 1
  1. 1.IFR 110 Ecosystèmes Forestiers, Agroressources, Bioprocédés et Alimentation, Unité Mixte de Recherches INRA UHP 1136 Interaction Arbres MicroorganismesUniversité Nancy I BP 239Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy CedexFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Génomique Fonctionnelle des Champignons Pathogènes des Plantes, Unité Mixte de Recherches 5240CNRS-UCB-INSA-Bayer CropScience Microbiologie, Adaptation et Pathogénie, Bayer CropScienceLyon cedex 9France

Personalised recommendations