Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences

, Volume 64, Issue 13, pp 1715–1722

Ginkgo biloba extract EGb® 761 increases endothelial nitric oxide production in vitro and in vivo

  • A. Koltermann
  • A. Hartkorn
  • E. Koch
  • R. Fürst
  • A. M. Vollmar
  • S. Zahler
Research Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00018-007-7085-z

Cite this article as:
Koltermann, A., Hartkorn, A., Koch, E. et al. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2007) 64: 1715. doi:10.1007/s00018-007-7085-z

Abstract.

Beneficial effects of Ginkgo biloba on peripheral arterial occlusive disease have been repeatedly shown in clinical trials, especially after use of EGb® 761, a standardized special extract. Since the underlying mechanisms are widely unknown, we aimed to elucidate the molecular basis on which EGb® 761 protects against endothelial dysfunction in vitro and in vivo. Application of therapeutically feasible doses of EGb® 761 for 48 h caused endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production by increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) promoter activity and eNOS expression in vitro. Phosphorylation of eNOS at a site typical for Akt (Ser 1177) was acutely enhanced by treatment with EGb® 761, as was Akt phosphorylation at Ser 478. Furthermore, the extract caused acute relaxation of isolated aortic rings and NO-dependent reduction of blood pressure in vivo in rats. These influences on eNOS represent a putative molecular basis for the protective cardiovascular properties of EGb® 761.

Keywords.

Blood pressurenitric oxide synthaseendotheliumvasodilation

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag, Basel 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Koltermann
    • 1
  • A. Hartkorn
    • 1
  • E. Koch
    • 2
  • R. Fürst
    • 1
  • A. M. Vollmar
    • 1
  • S. Zahler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical BiologyUniversity of MunichMunichGermany
  2. 2.Preclinical ResearchDr. Willmar Schwabe PharmaceuticalsKarlsruheGermany