Inflammation Research

, Volume 59, Issue 5, pp 323–334

Association between serum amyloid A and obesity: a meta-analysis and systematic review

  • Yulan Zhao
  • Xuelian He
  • Xuegui Shi
  • Chengjin Huang
  • Jie Liu
  • Shuli Zhou
  • Chew-Kiat Heng
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00011-010-0163-y

Cite this article as:
Zhao, Y., He, X., Shi, X. et al. Inflamm. Res. (2010) 59: 323. doi:10.1007/s00011-010-0163-y

Abstract

Background

Emerging evidence indicates an association of the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA) with obesity. Here we review and summarize quantitatively the available data related to this association.

Methods

PubMed was systematically searched using the terms “serum amyloid A” and “obesity.” Eighty-one relevant studies between January 1966 and July 2009 were identified. Of these, only 11 cross-sectional studies and 10 prospective studies with successful interventions met our inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis. All analyses were conducted using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. Literature pertaining to the relationship between SAA and other inflammatory markers, and the association between SAA and obesity-related disorders, such as cardiovascular diseases, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and insulin resistance was also reviewed.

Results

A strong association between body mass index and SAA levels was found in the 11 cross-sectional studies. The overall correlation coefficient is 0.230 (95% CI 0.160–0.297, P < 0.0005). The ten prospective studies were subsequently analyzed, and the difference in SAA levels before and after weight loss, expressed as standardized mean difference was −0.480 (95% CI −0.678 to −0.283, P < 0.0005). We discuss some potential underlying mechanisms and clinical applications for reducing SAA levels in obesity.

Keywords

Serum amyloid AObesityBMIWeight lossAdipose

Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yulan Zhao
    • 1
  • Xuelian He
    • 2
  • Xuegui Shi
    • 1
  • Chengjin Huang
    • 3
  • Jie Liu
    • 1
  • Shuli Zhou
    • 1
  • Chew-Kiat Heng
    • 4
  1. 1.Advanced Institute of NBIC Integrated Drug Discovery and DevelopmentEast China Normal UniversityShanghaiPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Central LaboratoryWuhan Children’s HospitalWuhanPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Department of General Internal MedicinePeking Union Medical School HospitalBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Department of PaediatricsNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore