Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis

, Volume 61, Issue 1, pp 25–41

Glioblastoma, a Brief Review of History, Molecular Genetics, Animal Models and Novel Therapeutic Strategies

Authors

    • Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
  • Kelly E. Burrell
    • Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
  • Amparo Wolf
    • Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
  • Sharzhad Jalali
    • Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
  • Cynthia Hawkins
    • Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
    • Department of Neuropathology, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
  • James T. Rutka
    • Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
    • Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
    • Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research Centre, Hospital for Sick ChildrenUniversity of Toronto
    • Department of Neurosurgery, Western HospitalUniversity of Toronto
Review

DOI: 10.1007/s00005-012-0203-0

Cite this article as:
Agnihotri, S., Burrell, K.E., Wolf, A. et al. Arch. Immunol. Ther. Exp. (2013) 61: 25. doi:10.1007/s00005-012-0203-0

Abstract

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor. Over the past few years tremendous genomic and proteomic characterization along with robust animal models of GBM have provided invaluable data that show that “GBM”, although histologically indistinguishable from one another, are comprised of molecularly heterogenous diseases. In addition, robust pre-clinical models and a better understanding of the core pathways disrupted in GBM are providing a renewed optimism for novel strategies targeting these devastating tumors. Here, we summarize a brief history of the disease, our current molecular knowledge, lessons from animal models and emerging concepts of angiogenesis, invasion, and metabolism in GBM that may lend themselves to therapeutic targeting.

Keywords

GlioblastomaMolecular genetics of gliomaMouse modelsNovel molecular targets

Copyright information

© L. Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Wroclaw, Poland 2012