Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis

, 56:299

Opiate abuse, innate immunity, and bacterial infectious diseases

  • Jinghua Wang
  • Roderick A. Barke
  • Jing Ma
  • Richard Charboneau
  • Sabita Roy
REVIEW

DOI: 10.1007/s00005-008-0035-0

Cite this article as:
Wang, J., Barke, R.A., Ma, J. et al. Arch. Immunol. Ther. Exp. (2008) 56: 299. doi:10.1007/s00005-008-0035-0

Abstract

The first line of defense against invading bacteria is provided by the innate immune system. Morphine and other opiates can immediately disrupt the body’s first line of defense against harmful external bacteria. Opiate, for example morphine, abuse degrades physical and physiologic barriers, and modulates phagocytic cells (macrophages, neutrophils) and, nonspecific cytotoxic T cells (γδ T), natural killer cells, and dendritic cells, that are functionally important for carrying out a rapid immune reaction to invading pathogens. In vitro studies with innate immune cells from experimental animals and humans and in vivo studies with animal models have shown that opiate abuse impairs innate immunity and is responsible for increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. However, to better understand the complex interactions between opiates, innate immunity, and bacterial infection and develop novel approaches to treat and even prevent bacterial infection in the opiate-abuse population, there is an urgent need to fill the numerous gaps in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which opiate abuse increases susceptibility to bacterial infection.

Keywords:

opiatemorphineinnate immunitymacrophagesneutrophilsdentritic cellsNK cellsγδ T lymphocytescytokinesbacterial infection

Abbreviations:

NK

natural killer

DCs

dendritic cells

AMs

alveolar macrophages

APCs

antigen-presenting cells.

Copyright information

© Birkhaueser 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jinghua Wang
    • 1
  • Roderick A. Barke
    • 2
  • Jing Ma
    • 1
    • 3
  • Richard Charboneau
    • 2
  • Sabita Roy
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Division of Basic and Translational Research, Department of SurgeryUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryVeterans Affairs Medical CenterMinneapolisUSA
  3. 3.Department of ImmunologyJilin University Norman Bethune Medical CollegeChangchunChina
  4. 4.Department of PharmacologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA