Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

, Volume 46, Supplement 1, pp S52–S61

The critical role of Th1-dominant immunity in tumor immunology

  • Takashi Nishimura
  • Minoru Nakui
  • Marimo Sato
  • Kenji Iwakabe
  • Hidemitsu Kitamura
  • Masashi Sekimoto
  • Akio Ohta
  • Toshiaki Koda
  • Shinichiro Nishimura

DOI: 10.1007/PL00014051

Cite this article as:
Nishimura, T., Nakui, M., Sato, M. et al. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol (2000) 46: S52. doi:10.1007/PL00014051

Abstract

 To investigate the precise role of antigen-specific Th1 and Th2 cells in tumor immunity, we developed a novel adoptive tumor-immunotherapy model using OVA-specific Th1 and Th2 cells and an OVA gene-transfected tumor. This therapeutic model demonstrated that both antigen-specific Th1 and Th2 cells had strong antitumor activity in vivo with distinct mechanisms. However, immunological memory suitable for the generation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was induced only when tumor-bearing mice received Th1 cell therapy, but not Th2 cell therapy. Thus it was strongly suggested that Th1-dominant immunity is critically important for the induction of antitumor cellular immunity in vivo. We also proposed that several immunomodulating protocols using interleukin (IL)-12, IL-12 gene, the natural killer T cell ligand α-galactosylceramide, or Th1 cytokine-conditioned dendritic cells might be useful strategies for the induction of Th1-dominant immunity essential for the development of tumor-specific immunotherapy.

Key words Th1Interleukin-12Natural killer T cellα-GalactosylceramideDendritic cellTumor immunotherapy

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takashi Nishimura
    • 1
  • Minoru Nakui
    • 2
  • Marimo Sato
    • 1
  • Kenji Iwakabe
    • 2
  • Hidemitsu Kitamura
    • 2
  • Masashi Sekimoto
    • 1
  • Akio Ohta
    • 1
  • Toshiaki Koda
    • 1
  • Shinichiro Nishimura
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Immunoregulation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, JapanJP
  2. 2.Section of Genetic Engineering, Center for Genetic Engineering and Cell Transplantation, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, JapanJP
  3. 3.Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, JapanJP
  4. 4.Division of Immunoregulation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, N15 W7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0815, Japan Tel. & Fax: +81-11-707-6835 e-mail: tak24@imm.hokudai.ac.jpJP