Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

, Volume 46, Supplement 1, pp S52–S61

The critical role of Th1-dominant immunity in tumor immunology

Authors

  • Takashi Nishimura
    • Division of Immunoregulation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
  • Minoru Nakui
    • Section of Genetic Engineering, Center for Genetic Engineering and Cell Transplantation, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan
  • Marimo Sato
    • Division of Immunoregulation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
  • Kenji Iwakabe
    • Section of Genetic Engineering, Center for Genetic Engineering and Cell Transplantation, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan
  • Hidemitsu Kitamura
    • Section of Genetic Engineering, Center for Genetic Engineering and Cell Transplantation, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan
  • Masashi Sekimoto
    • Division of Immunoregulation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
  • Akio Ohta
    • Division of Immunoregulation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
  • Toshiaki Koda
    • Division of Immunoregulation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan
  • Shinichiro Nishimura
    • Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan

DOI: 10.1007/PL00014051

Cite this article as:
Nishimura, T., Nakui, M., Sato, M. et al. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol (2000) 46: S52. doi:10.1007/PL00014051

Abstract

 To investigate the precise role of antigen-specific Th1 and Th2 cells in tumor immunity, we developed a novel adoptive tumor-immunotherapy model using OVA-specific Th1 and Th2 cells and an OVA gene-transfected tumor. This therapeutic model demonstrated that both antigen-specific Th1 and Th2 cells had strong antitumor activity in vivo with distinct mechanisms. However, immunological memory suitable for the generation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes was induced only when tumor-bearing mice received Th1 cell therapy, but not Th2 cell therapy. Thus it was strongly suggested that Th1-dominant immunity is critically important for the induction of antitumor cellular immunity in vivo. We also proposed that several immunomodulating protocols using interleukin (IL)-12, IL-12 gene, the natural killer T cell ligand α-galactosylceramide, or Th1 cytokine-conditioned dendritic cells might be useful strategies for the induction of Th1-dominant immunity essential for the development of tumor-specific immunotherapy.

Key words Th1Interleukin-12Natural killer T cellα-GalactosylceramideDendritic cellTumor immunotherapy
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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000