Dysphagia

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 28–31

Esophageal Manometric Abnormalities in Parkinson's Disease

  • Gabrio  Bassotti
  • Ugo  Germani
  • Sergio  Pagliaricci
  • Alina  Plesa
  • Ornella  Giulietti
  • Elmo  Mannarino
  • Antonio  Morelli

DOI: 10.1007/PL00009546

Cite this article as:
Bassotti, G., Germani, U., Pagliaricci, S. et al. Dysphagia (1998) 13: 28. doi:10.1007/PL00009546

Abstract.

The gastrointestinal tract, and especially the esophagus, is frequently involved in neurological diseases; however, objective studies of gut motor function are few. We carried out an esophageal manometric study in 18 patients with various stages of Parkinson's disease (4 stage I, 4 stage II, 7 stage III, and 3 stage IV) to evaluate the function of the viscus in this disease. Clinical assessment showed that 61% complained of esophageal symptoms such as dysphagia, acid regurgitation, pyrosis, and noncardiac chest pain. Manometric abnormalities were documented also in 61% patients, and were represented by repetitive contractions, simultaneous contractions, reduced LES pressure, and high-amplitude contractions. However, only 33.3% of patients had both symptoms and manometric abnormalities. We conclude that esophageal motor abnormalities are frequent in Parkinson's disease, and may appear at an early stage of the disease.

Key words: Esophagus — Manometry — Motility — Parkinson's disease — Deglutition — Deglutition disorders. 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gabrio  Bassotti
    • 1
  • Ugo  Germani
    • 1
  • Sergio  Pagliaricci
    • 2
  • Alina  Plesa
    • 1
  • Ornella  Giulietti
    • 2
  • Elmo  Mannarino
    • 2
  • Antonio  Morelli
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratorio di Motilità Intestinale, Clinica di Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia Digestiva, ItalyIT
  2. 2.Clinica Medica II, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica, Patologia e Farmacologia, Università di Perugia, ItalyIT
  3. 3.University of North Carolina Center for Functional Gastrointestinal Diseases and Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USAUS

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