Journal of Endocrinological Investigation

, Volume 25, Issue 10, pp 836–854

Neuroendocrine regulation of eating behavior

Authors

    • Internal Medicine, Department of Medical and Surgical SciencesUniversity of Padova
  • R. Fabris
    • Internal Medicine, Department of Medical and Surgical SciencesUniversity of Padova
  • C. Pagano
    • Internal Medicine, Department of Medical and Surgical SciencesUniversity of Padova
  • G. Federspil
    • Internal Medicine, Department of Medical and Surgical SciencesUniversity of Padova
Review Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF03344047

Cite this article as:
Vettor, R., Fabris, R., Pagano, C. et al. J Endocrinol Invest (2002) 25: 836. doi:10.1007/BF03344047

Abstract

The dual center hypothesis in the central control of energy balance originates from the first observations performed more than 5 decades ago with brain lesioning and stimulation experiments. On the basis of these studies the “satiety center” was located in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, since lesions of this region caused overfeeding and excessive weight gain, while its electrical stimulation suppressed eating. On the contrary, lesioning or stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus elicited the opposite set of responses, thus leading to the conclusion that this area represented the “feeding center”. The subsequent expansion of our knowledge of specific neuronal subpopulations involved in energy homeostasis has replaced the notion of specific “centers” controlling energy balance with that of discrete neuronal pathways fully integrated in a more complex neuronal network. The advancement of our knowledge on the anatomical structure and the function of the hypothalamic regions reveals the great complexity of this system. Given the aim of this review, we will focus on the major structures involved in the control of energy balance.

Key words

Hypothalamusneuropeptidesfood intakeobesityappetite controlleptin

Copyright information

© Italian Society of Endocrinology (SIE) 2002