Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 175–182

Relationship between whole body oxygen consumption and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism during walking in older adults: FDG PET study

  • Hiroyuki Shimada
  • Daina Sturnieks
  • Yosuke Endo
  • Yuichi Kimura
  • Takao Suzuki
  • Keiichi Oda
  • Kenji Ishii
  • Kiichi Ishiwata
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF03337747

Cite this article as:
Shimada, H., Sturnieks, D., Endo, Y. et al. Aging Clin Exp Res (2011) 23: 175. doi:10.1007/BF03337747
  • 36 Downloads

Abstract

Background and aims: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between whole body energy metabolism measured as oxygen consumption (VO2) and local muscle activity measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Methods: Ten community- dwelling older women (73–83 yrs) had FDG PET and VO2 measured while walking at a comfortable speed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between VO2 and FDG uptake in the biceps femoris (r=0.83), gluteus minimus (r=0.67), gluteus medius (r=0.77) and pelvis section muscles (r=0.76). The subjects who showed high FDG uptake in the hip muscle group had significantly higher VO2 while walking, compared with subjects without high FDG uptake in the hip muscles. Conclusions: These results indicate that FDG PET provides an index which reflects whole body energy metabolism during walking, and revealed that excess muscle activity in the hip muscles during walking plays a key role in increasing VO2 in older adults.

Keywords

Elderly lower extremity muscle positron emission tomography VO2 

Copyright information

© Springer Internal Publishing Switzerland 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroyuki Shimada
    • 1
  • Daina Sturnieks
    • 2
  • Yosuke Endo
    • 3
  • Yuichi Kimura
    • 4
  • Takao Suzuki
    • 5
  • Keiichi Oda
    • 6
  • Kenji Ishii
    • 6
  • Kiichi Ishiwata
    • 6
  1. 1.Section for Health Promotion, Department of Health and Medical Care, Center for Development of Advanced Medicine for DementiaNational Center for Geriatrics and GerontologyObu, AichiJapan
  2. 2.Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute and School of Medical SciencesUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Honda R&D Co., Ltd.Fundamental Technology Research CenterSaitamaJapan
  4. 4.Image Analysis Team, Biophysics Group, Molecular Imaging CenterNational Institute of Radiological SciencesChibaJapan
  5. 5.Research InstituteNational Center for Geriatrics and GerontologyAichiJapan
  6. 6.Positron Medical CenterTokyo Metropolitan Institute of GerontologyTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations