Acta Theriologica

, Volume 54, Issue 2, pp 171–181

Cranial morphometric and fine scale genetic variability of two adjacentMastomys natalensis (Rodentia: Muridae) populations

Authors

    • UMR CNRS 5202 - USM 601, Origine, Structure et Evolution de la Biodiversité, Département Systématique et EvolutionMuséum National d’Histoire Naturelle
    • Plate-forme Morphométrie MNHN-CNRS IFR
  • Michel Baylac
    • UMR CNRS 5202 - USM 601, Origine, Structure et Evolution de la Biodiversité, Département Systématique et EvolutionMuséum National d’Histoire Naturelle
    • Plate-forme Morphométrie MNHN-CNRS IFR
  • Jean François Cosson
    • Centre de Biologie et Gestion des Populations (UMR22)INRA
  • Rhodes H. Makundi
    • Rodent Research ProjectSokoine University of Agriculture
  • Robert S. Machang’u
    • Rodent Research ProjectSokoine University of Agriculture
  • Christiane Denys
    • UMR CNRS 5202 - USM 601, Origine, Structure et Evolution de la Biodiversité, Département Systématique et EvolutionMuséum National d’Histoire Naturelle
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF03193173

Cite this article as:
Lalis, A., Baylac, M., Cosson, J.F. et al. Acta Theriol (2009) 54: 171. doi:10.1007/BF03193173

Abstract

The objective of this multidisciplinary project was to study the intra-specific morphometric and genetic variability between two adjacent populations ofMastomys natalensis Smith, 1834 living in different environments. The study of micro-evolutionary processes at work by using geometrical morphometrics allowed us to define two groups, characterized by different features of the skull shape. Using molecular microsatellites analysis, we showed that the two populations exchanged high gene flow and could be considered as a single panmictic unit. These results suggest that this widely-distributed species exhibits a local population-level differentiation in shape variation of skulls, probably due to different ecological situations. We speculate that the variability in the cranial characteristics (connected with the feeding ability) could reveal a local adaptation preferentially based on the food availability. We propose an explanation linking the shape differences to the fitness gain in the exploitation of resources available in the two environments. Since we suggest a potential differentiation process between populations, we believe that the two groups constitute even better models to understand the factors involved in the early stages of local adaptations.

Key words

Mastomys natalensisintra-specific variabilityskull shape variationgeometric morphometricsgenetic differentiationmicrosatellites analysisTanzaniaTanzania

Copyright information

© Mammal Research Institute, Bialowieza, Poland 2009