Irish Journal of Medical Science

, 174:21

The importance of microbiological investigations, medications and artificial feeding in diarrhoea evaluation

  • A. McErlean
  • O. Kelly
  • S. Bergin
  • S. E. Patchett
  • F. E. Murray
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/BF03168514

Cite this article as:
McErlean, A., Kelly, O., Bergin, S. et al. Ir J Med Sci (2005) 174: 21. doi:10.1007/BF03168514

Abstract

Background

Diarrhoea in hospitalised patients is usually attributed to medications especially antibiotics, enteral tube feeding or enteropathogenic bacteria particularlyClostridium difficile.

Aims

The aim of this study was to evaluate the investigations performed on patients who developed diarrhoea during their stay in an acute general hospital.

Method

Over 18 working days, an unselected group of adult inpatients who developed diarrhoea following their admission to hospital were reviewed. Symptoms, medications, nutritional support and any investigations performed were assessed.

Results

Eighty-one patients developed diarrhoea. Forty-nine (60%) were receiving antibiotics prior to the development of symptoms, 30 (37%) were being enterally tube fed, 14 (17%) had positive stool forClostridium difficile A and B toxin and 3 (4%) had salmonella species positive stool.

Conclusion

The majority of cases of diarrhoea were related to medications and enteral tube feeding. A small but significant number did develop bacterial infections. In contrast to some suggested guidelines, when investigating hospital acquired diarrhoea, it is considered worthwhile to perform microbiological stool examinations.

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. McErlean
    • 1
  • O. Kelly
    • 1
  • S. Bergin
    • 1
  • S. E. Patchett
    • 1
  • F. E. Murray
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Pharmacology/GastroenterologyBeaumont Hospital and Royal College of Surgeons in IrelandDublin 9Ireland
  2. 2.Hepatology UnitBeaumont HospitalDublin 9