Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia

, Volume 42, Issue 6, pp 467–472

Lansoprazole reduces preoperative gastric fluid acidity and volume in children

  • Katsuya Mikawa
  • Kahoru Nishina
  • Nobuhiro Maekawa
  • Migiwa Asano
  • Hidefumi Obara
Reports of Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/BF03011682

Cite this article as:
Mikawa, K., Nishina, K., Maekawa, N. et al. Can J Anaesth (1995) 42: 467. doi:10.1007/BF03011682

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy of lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, in reducing the acidity and volume of gastric aspirate in children immediately following the induction of anaesthesia. One hundred healthy in-patients aged 3–11 yr undergoing elective surgery were randomly allocated to four groups (n = 25 each): lansoprazole-lansoprazole, placebo-placebo, placebo-lansoprazole, and lansoprazole-placebo. For each treatment regimen, the first medication was administered at 9:00 pm on the night before surgery and the second at 5:30 am on the morning of the day of surgery (three hours preoperatively). The dose of lansoprazole was 30 mg (approximately 1.4 mg · kg−1 mean). Children were offered 10 ml · kg−1 apple juice three hours before induction of anaesthesia. After induction of anaesthesia and tracheal intubation, gastric fluid was aspirated through a large-bore, multiorifice orogastric tube and analyzed for pH and total fluid volume. Lansoprazole increased gastric fluid pH and decreased gastric fluid volume regardless of whether it was administered before or after placebo. Two consecutive doses of lansoprazole was the most effective means of increasing the pH and reducing the volume of gastric aspirate; in this group, there were no subjects with gastric aspirate volume >0.4 ml · kg−1 and pH <2.5. Oral lansoprazole, at least 30 mg, given on the night before surgery or on the morning of surgery will improve the gastric environment at the time of induction of paediatric anaesthesia. The most effective regimen was two doses (at bedtime and on the morning) of lansoprazole.

Key words

anaesthesia: paediatriccomplications: aspirationgastrointestinal tract: gastric fluid volume, gastric pHpremedication: lansoprazole

Résumé

Cette étude a pour objectif l’évaluation de l’efficacité du lansoprazole, un inhibiteur de la pompe à proton, sur la réduction de l’acidité et du volume du contenu gastriques chez l’enfant mesurés immédiatement après l’induction de l’anesthésie. Cent sujets bien portants âgés de 3 à 11 ans hospitalisés pour une chirurgie non urgente sont répartis au hasard en quatre groupes (n = 25 par groupe) de la façon suivante: lansaprazole-lansaprazole, placebo-placebo, placebo-lansaprazole, et lansaprazole-placebo. Dans tous les cas, la première médication est administrée à 21:00 la veille de la chirurgie et la deuxième à 5:30 le matin de la chirurgie (trois heures avant l’intervention). La dose de lansaprazole est de 30 mg (environ 1,4 mg · kg−1 en moyenne). On offre aux enfant 10 ml · kg−1 de jus de pomme trois heures avant l’induction de l’anesthésie. Après l’induction et l’intubation de la trachée, le liquide gastrique est aspiré avec une sonde gastrique de gros calibre à plusieurs orifices et on analyse son pH et son volume. La lansaprazole augmente le pH et diminue le volume du contenu gastrique qu’il soit administré avant ou après le placebo. Le moyen le plus efficace pour augmenter le pH et diminuer le volume est d’administrer deux doses de lansaprazole successives: dans ce groupe, le volume du contenu gastrique est toujours inférieur à 0,4 ml · kg−1 et le pH supérieur à 2,5. Le lansaprazole, à la dose de 30 mg, administré par la bouche la veille ou le matin de la chirurgie améliore les paramètres gastrique au moment de l’induction de l’anesthésie. La méthode la plus sûre est constituée par l’administration de deux doses de lansaprazole, au coucher et le matin.

Download to read the full article text

Copyright information

© Canadian Anesthesiologists 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katsuya Mikawa
    • 1
  • Kahoru Nishina
    • 1
  • Nobuhiro Maekawa
    • 1
  • Migiwa Asano
    • 1
  • Hidefumi Obara
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnaesthesiologyKobe University School of MedicineChuo-ku, KobeJapan