International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 134–140

Silent myocardial ischemia and cardiovascular responses to anger provocation in older adults

  • Jessica P. Brown
  • Leslie I. Katzel
  • Serina A. Neumann
  • Shari R. Waldstein
  • Karl J. Maier
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF03000184

Cite this article as:
Brown, J.P., Katzel, L.I., Neumann, S.A. et al. Int. J. Behav. Med. (2007) 14: 134. doi:10.1007/BF03000184

Abstract

To determine if older, asymptomatic individuals with no prior history of coronary heart disease with exercise-induced silent myocardial ischemia (SI) during graded exercise treadmill testing exhibit exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to anger provocation, we compared 42 SI participants and 95 controls. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) changes from baseline to three tasks & #x2014;anger recall, speech role-play, and mental arithmetic with harassment & #x2014;were assessed. Compared to controls, SI displayed greater HR responses for the speech role-play task only. The SI group was significantly older, had higher levels of fasting glucose and triglycerides, and had lower HDL-cholesterol. In multiple regression analyses, after controlling for these differences, SI was significantly associated with greater HR responses to the speech role-play. In sum, the SI group had significantly exaggerated HR responses to the speech role-play task, whereas SBP and DBP reactivity were comparable between groups. This suggests minimally enhanced cardiovascular reactivity among older SI patients that may nonetheless increase risk for cardiac events.

Key words

silent ischemia older adults cardiovascular reactivity 

Copyright information

© International Society of Behavioral Medicine 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jessica P. Brown
    • 1
  • Leslie I. Katzel
    • 2
  • Serina A. Neumann
    • 3
    • 4
  • Shari R. Waldstein
    • 5
  • Karl J. Maier
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Preventive MedicineUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimore
  2. 2.Department of Medicine, Division of GerontologyUniversity of Maryland School of Medicine & Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical CenterBaltimore
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandBaltimore CountyBaltimore
  4. 4.Department of Medicine, Division of GerontologyUniversity of Maryland School of Medicine & Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Baltimore Veterans AffairsMedical CenterBaltimore
  5. 5.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesEastern Virginia Medical SchoolNorfolk
  6. 6.Department of PsychologySalisbury UniversitySalisbury

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