Article

Irish Journal of Medical Science

, 164:109

First online:

Long term outcome of renal transplantation in the pre cyclosporin era: One centre’s experience

  • P. J. ConlonAffiliated withDepartment of Renal Medicine and Transplantation, Beaumont Hospital
  • , W. MedwarAffiliated withDepartment of Renal Medicine and Transplantation, Beaumont Hospital
  • , S. HansonAffiliated withDepartment of Renal Medicine and Transplantation, Beaumont Hospital
  • , J. DonohoeAffiliated withDepartment of Renal Medicine and Transplantation, Beaumont Hospital
  • , M. CarmodyAffiliated withDepartment of Renal Medicine and Transplantation, Beaumont Hospital
  • , J. J. WalsheAffiliated withDepartment of Renal Medicine and Transplantation, Beaumont Hospital

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Abstract

The number of renal transplants has been increasing steadily over the last twenty years. This increase has been associated with a significant improvement in the one year graft and patient survival. However, as survival improves, long term complications are becoming more clinically important. We, therefore, retrospectively reviewed our experience of renal transplantation in 165 patients between January 1970 and December 1980, and describe in detail the complications experienced by those whose grafts functioned for 10 years or longer.

The 10 year patient survival rate was 47% and graft survival rate was 30%. The graft survival rate for living related grafts was superior to that of cadaveric grafts. The major cause of mortality in the first year following renal transplantation was infection and in subsequent years, cardiovascular disease predominated. Patients whose grafts functioned for 10 years or more developed a variety of complications including infection, skin cancer and hepatic dysfunction. Clinicians involved in the long term care of the patients need to be aware of these problems and skilled in their management.