Special Lecture

Breast Cancer

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 213-220

First online:

Therapy of primary breast cancer in the 21st century: A prediction

  • Hans-Jörg SennAffiliated withDepartments of Medicine (Oncology-Hematology), KantonsspitalCenter for Tumor Detection and Prevention
  • , Véronique Dupont LampertAffiliated withGeneral Surgery, KantonsspitalCenter for Tumor Detection and Prevention
  • , Beat ThürlimannAffiliated withDepartments of Medicine (Oncology-Hematology), Kantonsspital

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New treatment selection criteria will arise from molecular biology parameters of growth and treatment response, most probably coupled with the increasing use of initial chemotherapy and repeated minimally invasive surgery.


Secondary and hopefully also primary prevention of breast cancer will become more and more successful in the era of molecular genetics, and such interventions will be more directed to individuals and groups at defined higher risk.


Surgery will increasingly tend towards “minimally invasive surgery,” which favors not only cosmetics and quality of life, but also more appropriate imaging follow-up.


Primary (preoperative) chemo- and endocrine therapy will become the standard initial form of breast cancer treatment, with the intent of down-staging of the tumors to allow later breast-conserving procedures, but also to use the tumor as a biological response parameter and hopefully also for better clinical outcome.

Cost — Effectiveness

Economical parameters might become more and more decisive, as we will have to live with much more “evidence based medicine” and with much more restricted allocation of resources in the future.

This might mean, that we will have to diligently develop more simple and cheaper, but not prognostically worse treatment strategies in years to come. More specifically: Do we still need all of the traditional steps in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in order to achieve the same results?

Gain of Life

Finally in all of this, we have to make clearcut assumptions, supported also by society and people involved: How do we value “gained years of life” in breast cancer adjuvant and prevention trials? This certainly is not predominantly a medical or economical, but rather an ethical, social and political problem, which has to be finally answered by our socio-cultural environment, and not by doctors alone.

Key words

Breast cancer Adjuvant therapy Primary therapy