Do enhanced friendship networks and active coping mediate the effect of self-help groups on substance abuse?

  • Keith Humphreys
  • Eric S. Mankowski
  • Rudolf H. Moos
  • John W. Finney
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02895034

Cite this article as:
Humphreys, K., Mankowski, E.S., Moos, R.H. et al. ann. behav. med. (1999) 21: 54. doi:10.1007/BF02895034

Abstract

Self-help groups are the most commonly sought source of help for substance abuse problems, but few studies have evaluated the mechanisms through which they exert their effects on members. The present project evaluates mediators of the effects of self-help groups in a sample of 2,337 male veterans who were treated for substance abuse. The majority of participants became involved in self-help groups after inpatient treatment, and this involvement predicted reduced substance use at 1-year follow-up. Both enhanced friendship networks and increased active coping responses appeared to mediate these effects. Implications for self-help groups and professional treatments are discussed.

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Humphreys
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eric S. Mankowski
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rudolf H. Moos
    • 1
    • 2
  • John W. Finney
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Health Care EvaluationVA Palo Alto Health Care System (152-MPD)Menlo Park
  2. 2.Stanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA