Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 263–274

Efficacy of a behavioral intervention for increasing safer sex behaviors in HIV-negative, heterosexual methamphetamine users: Results from the fast-lane study

  • Brent T. Mausbach
  • Shirley J. Semple
  • Jim Zians
  • Thomas L. Patterson
  • Steffanie A. Strathdee
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02874551

Cite this article as:
Mausbach, B.T., Semple, S.J., Zians, J. et al. ann. behav. med. (2007) 34: 263. doi:10.1007/BF02874551

Abstract

Background: The risk of acquiring HIV is particularly high among persons who use methamphetamine, which is often associated with unprotected sex and high numbers of sexual partners.Purpose: This study examined the efficacy of a behavioral intervention emphasizing motivational interviewing and social cognitive theory for increasing safer sex behaviors in the context of ongoing methamphetamine use in a sample of HIV-negative, heterosexual methamphetamine users.Methods: Four hundred fifty-one participants from San Diego, California, were randomly assigned to receive one of three treatment conditions: (a) a safer sex behavioral intervention (Fast-Lane [FL]), (b) the FL intervention with boosters (FL+B), or (c) a time-equivalent diet-and-exercise attention-control (D&E) condition. Random effects regression analyses were used to evaluate change in safer sex behaviors over an 18-month period.Results: Compared to those in the D&E condition, participants in the FL+B condition (p=.019) and FL condition (p=.020) significantly increased their engagement in protected sex acts over the active intervention phase. Also, compared to the D&E condition, those in the FL condition demonstrated a significant decrease in unprotected sex (p=.005) and an increase in percent protected sex (p=.001) during the active intervention. Finally, relative to D&E participants, FL participants demonstrated significant improvements in self-efficacy for negotiating safer sex (p=.011), and change in self-efficacy mediated the efficacy of the FL condition for increasing safer sex behaviors (p=.033).Conclusions: These results suggest that our behavioral intervention was successful in terms of reducing high-risk sexual behaviors in the context of ongoing methamphetamine use among HIV-negative heterosexuals. Reductions in high-risk sexual behavior were likely because of the impact of the intervention on participants’ self-efficacy for negotiating safer sex.

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brent T. Mausbach
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shirley J. Semple
    • 1
  • Jim Zians
    • 1
  • Thomas L. Patterson
    • 1
  • Steffanie A. Strathdee
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry (0680)University of California, San DiegoLa Jolla
  2. 2.Veterans Affairs Center for Excellence on Stress and Mental HealthUSA
  3. 3.Department of Family and Preventive MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego