Advances in Therapy

, Volume 24, Issue 3, pp 648–661

Effect of timing of glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition on intestinal damage caused by irradiation

Authors

    • Department of General SurgeryGazi University Faculty of Medicine
  • Mehmet Oguz
    • Department of General SurgeryGazi University Faculty of Medicine
  • Müge Akmansu
    • Department of Radiation OncologyGazi University Faculty of Medicine
  • Ilhan Bebitoglu
    • Department of BiochemistryZübeyde Hanim Maternity Hospital
  • Gülcin Akca
    • Department of MicrobiologyGazi University Faculty of Medicine
  • Nedim Sultan
    • Department of MicrobiologyGazi University Faculty of Medicine
  • Ugur Emre
    • Department of General SurgeryKaraelmas University Faculty of Medicine
  • Mustafa Kerem
    • Department of General SurgeryGazi University Faculty of Medicine
  • Utku Yilmaz
    • Department of General SurgeryGazi University Faculty of Medicine
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02848790

Cite this article as:
Salman, B., Oguz, M., Akmansu, M. et al. Adv Therapy (2007) 24: 648. doi:10.1007/BF02848790

Abstract

Intestinal mucosal damage and bacterial translocation are clinical problems that may be caused by the use of ionizing radiation. Glutamine (Gln) support reduces the mucosal barrier in several ways. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of timing of Gln-enriched enteral nutrition (EN) on bacterial translocation and mucosal damage due to radiotherapy (RT). A rat model of whole body irradiation was designed in which a single dose of 485 cGy was given. A total of 50 rats were randomly assigned to the following 5 groups, each of which comprised 10 rats: (1) balanced rat chow given for 8 days without RT (group 1); (2) balanced rat chow given 4 days before and 4 days after RT (group 2); (3) Gln-enriched EN given 4 days before RT (group 3); (4) Gln-enriched EN given 4 days after RT (group 4); and (5) Gln-enriched EN given 4 days before and 4 days after RT (group 5). Mesenteric lymph node and ileum samples were removed for evaluation of bacterial translocation (BT) and histopathologic investigation, respectively. BT and intestinal mucosal injury scores in all rats that received RT were higher than in rats without RT. No difference was seen in parameters between groups 3 and 4 (P>.05, P>.016, respectively); BT and intestinal mucosal injury scores of group 5 were significantly lower than those of groups 3 and 4 (P<.05, P<.016, respectively). Meanwhile, the BT and mesenteric injury scores of group 5 were significantly lower than those of group 2 (P<.05, P<.016, respectively). As a result, intestinal injury due to RT was significantly decreased by Gln-enriched EN support given before and after whole body RT.

Keywords

glutamineenteral nutritionirradiationintestinal damage

Copyright information

© Health Communications Inc 2007