Psychopharmacology

, Volume 127, Issue 1, pp 55–62

Assessing the senok, sory role of nicotine in cigarette smoking

  • Walter S. Pritchard
  • John H. Robinson
  • Thomas D. Guy
  • Riley A. Davis
  • Mitchell F. Stiles
Original Investigation

DOI: 10.1007/BF02805975

Cite this article as:
Pritchard, W.S., Robinson, J.H., Guy, T.D. et al. Psychopharmacology (1996) 127: 55. doi:10.1007/BF02805975

Abstract

Thirty-two subjects were tested in five double-blind sessions (16 subjects in the morning following overnight smoking abstention, and 16 in the afternoon following ad-lib smoking). In each session, subjects smoked one of five experimental (EX) cigarettes having the following FTC nicotine/‘tar’ yields in mg: 0.08/8.5, 0.17/9.1, 0.37/9.8, 0.48/9.8, and 0.74/10.4. In a sixth session, subjects smoked a 0.71/8.6 commercial ‘light’ (CL) cigarette that was their usual brand. Before and after smoking, subjects subjectively rated their desire to smoke a cigarette of their usual brand and had blood smaples drawn. Following smoking subjects rated the cigarette on a variety of sensory dimensions; they also rated smoking satisfaction. Analysis of variance indicated that nicotine played an important sensory role for a variety of dimensions related to cigarette taste and sensory impact but not perceived draw. Principal-components analyses indicated that sensory factors were at least as important as nicotine pharmacology (indirectly indexed by the preto post-smoking rise in blood nicotine concentration) when considering smoking’s overall effects on satisfaction, product acceptance, and reduction in desire to smoke.

Key words

NicotineCigarette smokingSensory roleHuman

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter S. Pritchard
    • 1
  • John H. Robinson
    • 1
  • Thomas D. Guy
    • 1
  • Riley A. Davis
    • 1
  • Mitchell F. Stiles
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychophysiology Laboratory, Bowman Gray Technical Center 611-12R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyWinston-SalemUSA