Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 9, Issue 6, pp 321–326

Faculty ratings of resident humanism predict patient satisfaction ratings in ambulatory medical clinics

Authors

  • Peter J. McLeod
    • Department of MedicineMontreal General Hospital
  • Robyn Tamblyn
  • Sam Benaroya
  • Linda Snellmd
Original Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF02599179

Cite this article as:
McLeod, P.J., Tamblyn, R., Benaroya, S. et al. J Gen Intern Med (1994) 9: 321. doi:10.1007/BF02599179

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether patient satisfaction ratings can be predicted by faculty ratings or self-ratings of resident humanism.

Design: A prospective three-month collection of patient satisfaction ratings in two ambulatory care clinics and simultaneous acquisition of faculty ratings and self-ratings of resident humanism using ABIM questionnaires.

Setting: Two teaching hospital ambulatory care internal medicine clinics.

Participants: Forty-seven internal medicine residents and 17 faculty internists were sent questionnaires for evaluation of humanism of individual residents. One thousand one hundred ninety-four consecutive outpatients cared for by the residents were eligible for patient satisfaction questionnaires.

Measurements and main results: Thirty-three residents and 13 faculty completed evaluations of resident humanism while 792 patients completed satisfaction questionnaires, which were used for analysis. The faculty ratings of resident humanism correlated strongly with patient satisfaction ratings, while the resident self-ratings did not.

Conclusions: Faculty ratings of resident humanism were highly predictive of patient satisfaction with the care rendered by internal medicine residents in two ambulatory care clinics. This suggests that ambulatory care settings are useful for evaluation of noncognitive behavioral features of resident performance.

Key words

patient satisfactionresidentsperformance assessmenthumanismambulatory care clinics
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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 1994