Perspectives

Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 248-251

First online:

Mentorship in general internal medicine

Investment in our future
  • Marilyn M. SchapiraAffiliated withthe Division of General Internal Medicine, Duke University Medical Center
  • , Adina KaletAffiliated withthe Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, New York University Medical Center
  • , Mark D. SchwartzAffiliated withthe Division of Primary Care Internal Medicine, New York University Medical Center
  • , Martha S. GerrityAffiliated withthe Division of General Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina

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Conclusion

Academic development in GIM is a challenging and difficult process. Mentoring may be an essential ingredient to that process. It is important to structure programs such that these relationships can develop effectively. In doing so, GIM divisions must deal with problems raised by having young faculty with diverse research interests. By supporting good mentoring relationships, GIM divisions may help their research and tranining programs to flourish.