Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 195–199

Ritual-enema-induced colitis

  • Isdor Segal
  • Leonard Ou Tim
  • Donald G. Hamilton
  • Hugh H. Lawson
  • Albert Solomon
  • Frederick Kalk
  • Stanley A. R. Cooke
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02586822

Cite this article as:
Segal, I., Tim, L.O., Hamilton, D.G. et al. Dis Colon Rectum (1979) 22: 195. doi:10.1007/BF02586822

Summary and Conclusions

Enemas are routinely used in South Africa for various reasons including for ritual purposes; as an aperient, aphrodisiac or emetic; and for the treatment of impotence, febrile symptoms, abdominal pains, dysmenorrhea and dysentery. Substances used include herbal medicines, Dettol, vinegar, caustics, soap, potassium dichromate, copper sulfate, potassium permanganate, and brown sugar. Eleven patients in whom colitis developed following enema administration are described. Peritonitis and rectal bleeding are the clinical hallmarks. Features demonstrated by roentgenogram vary from ostensibly normal to fistula and stricture formation. In mild cases, there are occasionally neutrophils in the lamina propria; in severe cases, complete necrosis of the bowel wall is observed. Conservative therapy is advocated for the mild cases. The type of operative treatment performed depends on the complication observed.

Copyright information

© American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isdor Segal
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Leonard Ou Tim
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Donald G. Hamilton
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Hugh H. Lawson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Albert Solomon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Frederick Kalk
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Stanley A. R. Cooke
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of GastroenterologyBaragwanath HospitalJohannesburgSouth Africa
  2. 2.South African Institute for Medical ResearchJohannesburg General HospitalJohannesburgSouth Africa
  3. 3.University of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa
  4. 4.Gastroenterology UnitBaragwanath HospitalP O BertshamSouth Africa