Lipids

, Volume 30, Issue 6, pp 485–492

Plasma and lipoprotein lipid peroxidation in humans on sunflower and rapessed oil diets

  • Anu M. Turpeinen
  • Georg Alfthan
  • Liisa Valsta
  • Eino Hietanen
  • Jukka T. Salonen
  • Hanna Schunk
  • Kristiina Nyyssönen
  • Marja Mutanen
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02537021

Cite this article as:
Turpeinen, A.M., Alfthan, G., Valsta, L. et al. Lipids (1995) 30: 485. doi:10.1007/BF02537021

Abstract

The effects of natural mixed diets on lipid peroxidation were investigated in humans. In the first study, 59 subjects were fed a rapeseed oil-based diet rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and a sunflower oil-based diet rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in a cross-over manner for three and a half weeks. The lipid peroxidation products in plasma were determined by measuring conjugated dienes and malondialdehyde (MDA). In a second study, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides, and the susceptibility of very low density lipoprotein + low-density lipoprotein (LDL) toin vitro oxidation were measured from subjects fed similar MUFA and PUFA diets for six week diets. No significant differences in plasma MDA or conjugated diene concentrations were found after the rapeseed oil diet or the sunflower oil diet in Study 1. In the second study, a small but significant decrease (P<0.05) in both lipid hydroperoxides and TBARS was observed in the LDL fraction after the sunflower oil diet. Thein vitro oxidation gave opposite results, showing increased oxidation after the sunflower oil diet. Despite a high intake of α-tocopherol during the oil peroids, no increase in plasma α-tocopherol was noticed in either study. The results suggest that moderate changes in the fatty acid composition in the Western-type diet may be adequate to affect lipoprotein susceptibility to oxidationin vitro, but there is considerable disparity with some indices ofin vivo lipid peroxidation.

Abbreviations

BHT

butylated hydroxytoluene

BuOH

n-buthanol

CV

coefficient of variation

en%

percent of energy

GSHPx

glutathione peroxidase

HDL

high-density lipoprotein

HPLC

high-performance liquid chromatography

IDL

intermediate-density lipoprotein

LDL

low-density lipoprotein

MDA

malondialdehyde

MUFA

monounsaturated fatty acids

PBS

phosphate buffered saline

PUFA

polyunsaturated fatty acids

TBA

thiobarbituric acid

TBARS

thiobarbituric acid reactive substances

VLDL

very low density lipoprotein

Copyright information

© American Oil Chemists’ Society 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anu M. Turpeinen
    • 1
  • Georg Alfthan
    • 2
  • Liisa Valsta
    • 1
  • Eino Hietanen
    • 3
  • Jukka T. Salonen
    • 4
  • Hanna Schunk
    • 3
  • Kristiina Nyyssönen
    • 4
  • Marja Mutanen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, Division of NutritionUniversity of HelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Department of NutritionNational Public Health InstituteHelsinkiFinland
  3. 3.International Agency for Research on Cancer, LyonLyonFrance
  4. 4.Research Institute of Public HealthUniversity of KuopioKuopioFinland
  5. 5.Department of Clinical PhysiologyUniversity of TurkuTurkuFinland