Article

Cytotechnology

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 85-97

Specific monoclonal antibody productivity and the cell cycle-comparisons of batch, continuous and perfusion cultures

  • Mohamed Al-RubeaiAffiliated withCentre for Biochemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham
  • , A. N. EmeryAffiliated withCentre for Biochemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham
  • , S. ChalderAffiliated withCentre for Biochemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham
  • , D. C. JanAffiliated withCentre for Biochemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

A selection of mouse hybridoma cell lines showed a variation of approximately two orders of magnitude in intracellular monoclonal antibody contents. The different levels directly influenced apparent specific monoclonal antibody productivity during the death phase but not during the growth phase of a batch culture. The pattern of changes in specific productivity during culture remained basically similar even though at different levels for all cell lines tested. Arresting the cells in the G1 phase using thymidine increased the specific productivity, cell volume and intracellular antibody content but at the same time led to decreased viability. In continuous culture DNA synthesis decreased with decreasing dilution rate though without an accompanying change in cell cycle and cell size distributions. The data shows both the decrease in viability and intracellular antibody content to be important factors which influence the negative association between specific antibody productivity and growth rate. In high cell density perfusion culture, when the cell cycle was prolonged by slow growth, viability was low and dead, but not lysed, cells were retained in the system, the specific antibody productivity was nearly two fold higher than that obtained in either batch or continuous cultures. The results imply that the prolongation of G1 phase and the increase in death rate of cells storing a large amount of antibody together cause an apparent increase in specific antibody productivity.

Key words

monoclonal antibody hybridoma cell cycle flow cytometry