The journal of mental health administration

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 92–106

The costs of mental health services under the Fort Bragg demonstration

  • E. Michael Foster
  • Wm. Thomas Summerfelt
  • Robert C. Saunders
Articles

DOI: 10.1007/BF02518646

Cite this article as:
Foster, E.M., Summerfelt, W.T. & Saunders, R.C. The Journal of Mental Health Administration (1996) 23: 92. doi:10.1007/BF02518646

Abstract

This article examines the costs of treatment under the Fort Bragg Demonstration. It focuses on the direct costs of mental health services and suggests that expenditures on those services were much higher at the Demonstration. Increased access and greater “doses” of services provided at the Demonstration are identified as the proximal causes of the system-level cost difference. Consideration is given to whether these differences in costs and in service use can be attributed to the continuum of care per se or to differences in the financial arrangements under which care was provided. Supplemental analyses suggest that these expenditures were not offset by cost savings elsewhere. Implications for mental health policy are discussed.

Copyright information

© Association of Mental Health Administrators 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Michael Foster
    • 1
  • Wm. Thomas Summerfelt
    • 1
  • Robert C. Saunders
    • 1
  1. 1.Public Policy and Economics, Vanderbilt Institute for Public Policy StudiesVanderbilt UniversityNashville