, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 16-22

The prognostic significance of lymph node metastasis and intrapancreatic perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer after curative resection

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Abstract

To investigate the prognostic factors of pancreatic cancer, a retrospective analysis of 193 patients who underwent curative resection was conducted. Of the 193 patients, 38 (20%) survived for more than 5 years, the 5-year survival rates for stages I, II, III, and IV disease being 41%, 17% 11%, and 6%, respectively. According to a multivariate analysis, lymph node metastasis, intrapancreatic perineural invasion, and portal vein invasion were significant prognostic factors. Subsequently, a subgroup analysis concerning nodal metastasis and intrapancreatic perineural invasion was performed in 126 patients with records of these histological findings. In the group of patients without nodal metastasis, the 5-year survival rate for those without perineural invasion was 75%, whereas that for those with perineural invasion was 29%, the difference in survival of these subgroups being significant (P<0.02). In the group of patients with nodal metastasis, the 5-year survival rate for those without perineural invasion was 17%, while that for those with perineural invasion was 10%. The most favorable 5-year survival of 89% was observed in the subgroup of patients with stage I disease without perineural invasion. Thus, pancreatic adenocarcinoma categorized by the combination of these independent types of biological behavior showed 5-year survival rates ranging from very high to low, indicating that these two factors play an important role in the prognosis of this disease.