Brain Tumor Pathology

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 117–120

Immunohistochemical analysis of SOX6 expression in human brain tumors

  • Ryo Ueda
  • Kazunari Yoshida
  • Yutaka Kawakami
  • Takeshi Kawase
  • Masahiro Toda
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02482186

Cite this article as:
Ueda, R., Yoshida, K., Kawakami, Y. et al. Brain Tumor Pathol (2004) 21: 117. doi:10.1007/BF02482186

Abstract

We previously demonstrated that the developmentally regulated gene,SOX6, is strongly expressed in glioma cells and in the fetal brain, but only faintly in the normal adult brain. Recent studies have indicated that brain tumor cells may share antigens, signaling systems, and behavior with neural stem/progenitor cells. To test the validity of this proposition, we analyzed the expression of SOX6 in various human central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors expressed SOX6; neuronal-glial cell tumors (central neurocytoma) and embryonal tumors (medulloblastoma), which arise from multipotential stem cell precursors, also showed a high intensity of SOX6 staining. In contrast, ependymal tumors (ependymoma and subependymoma), meningioma, and schwannoma, which are all well differentiated tumors, showed either no staining or only faint staining for SOX6. These results suggest that SOX6 may be expressed in bipotential or multipotential cells capable of neuronal and glial differentiation, but not in fully differentiated cells. SOX6 may be a useful marker for the diagnosis of tumors arising from immature bipotential cells that may differentiate into neuronal and glial cells.

Key words

SOX6Brain tumorUndifferentiated cellNeural stem/progenitor cell

Copyright information

© The Japan Society of Brain Tumor Pathology 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryo Ueda
    • 1
  • Kazunari Yoshida
    • 2
  • Yutaka Kawakami
    • 3
  • Takeshi Kawase
    • 2
  • Masahiro Toda
    • 2
    • 1
  1. 1.Neuroimmunology Research GroupKeio University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of NeurosurgeryKeio University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Division of Cellular Signaling, Institute for Advanced Medical ResearchKeio University School of MedicineTokyoJapan