Calcified Tissue International

, Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 455–460

Studies on the role of vitamin D in early skeletal development, mineralization, and growth in rats

  • Scott C. Miller
  • Bernard P. Halloran
  • Hector F. DeLuca
  • Webster S. S. Jee
Laboratory Investigations

DOI: 10.1007/BF02405076

Cite this article as:
Miller, S.C., Halloran, B.P., DeLuca, H.F. et al. Calcif Tissue Int (1983) 35: 455. doi:10.1007/BF02405076

Summary

The role of vitamin D in early skeletal development was studied by measuring serum calcium and phosphorus, osseous tissue quantity and mineralization, and endochondral bone elongation in rat fetuses and pups from vitamin D-replete and vitamin D-deficient mothers. At the 20th day of pregnancy there was a slight, yet significant, increase in the amount of osteoid on trabecular bone surfaces in fetuses from vitamin D-deficient mothers. The fetal bones otherwise appeared normal in spite of severe skeletal changes in the vitamin D-deficient mothers. After parturition, the importance of vitamin D in skeletal development becomes progressively more obvious. Serum calcium levels were slightly, yet significantly, lower in vitamin D-deficient than in vitamin D-replete pups and these levels continued to fall in the vitamin D-deficient pups through lactation and after weaning. At 3 days postpartum, there was a small, yet significant, increase in the amount of osteoid on bone surfaces of the vitamin D-deficient pups. The relative amounts of osteoid in the vitamin D-deficient pups continued to increase through lactation and after weaning when compared with vitamin D-replete pups. By the 14th day of lactation and at later periods, there were significant reductions in metaphyseal mineralized tissues in the vitamin D-deficient pups when compared with the vitamin D-replete pups. At weaning and after weaning, there were substantial increases in growth plate thickness and decreases in longitudinal bone growth in the vitamin D-deficient pups when compared with the vitamin D-replete pups. The results from this study indicate that vitamin D does not appear to play a major role in fetal skeletal development. However, after birth, vitamin D becomes progressively more important with age for normal bone development, mineralization, and endochondral growth.

Key words

Vitamin D Vitamin D deficiency Bone Cartilage Bone development 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott C. Miller
    • 1
  • Bernard P. Halloran
    • 2
  • Hector F. DeLuca
    • 2
  • Webster S. S. Jee
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Radiobiology, Department of Pharmacology, School of MedicineUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry, College of Agricultural and Life SciencesUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medicine, School of MedicineUniversity of California at San Francisco, Veterans Administration HospitalSan FranciscoUSA

Personalised recommendations