Biochemical Genetics

, Volume 34, Issue 7, pp 321–341

Gene-specific universal mammalian sequence-tagged sites: Application to the canine genome

Authors

  • Patrick J. Venta
    • Department of Microbiology, College of Veterinary MedicineMichigan State University
    • Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary MedicineMichigan State University
    • Genetics ProgramMichigan State University
  • James A. Brouillette
    • Department of Microbiology, College of Veterinary MedicineMichigan State University
    • Genetics ProgramMichigan State University
  • Vilma Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan
    • Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary MedicineMichigan State University
  • George J. Brewer
    • Department of Human GeneticsThe University of Michigan Medical School
Article

DOI: 10.1007/BF02399951

Cite this article as:
Venta, P.J., Brouillette, J.A., Yuzbasiyan-Gurkan, V. et al. Biochem Genet (1996) 34: 321. doi:10.1007/BF02399951

Abstract

We are developing a genetic map of the dog based partly upon markers contained within known genes. In order to facilitate the development of these markers, we have used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers designed to conserved regions of genes that have been sequenced in at least two species. We have refined the method for designing primers to maximize the number that produce successful amplifications across as many mammalian species as possible. We report the development of primer sets for 11 loci in detail:CFTR, COL10A1, CSFIR, CYP1A1, DCN1, FES, GHR, GLB1, PKLR, PVALB, andRB1. We also report an additional 75 primer sets in the appendices. The PCR products were sequenced to show that the primers amplify the expected canine genes. These primer sets thus define a class of gene-specific sequence-tagged sites (STSs). There are a number of uses for these STSs, including the rapid development of various linkage tools and the rapid testing of genomic and cDNA libraries for the presence of their corresponding genes. Six of the eleven gene targets reported in detail have been proposed to serve as “anchored reference loci” for the development of mammalian genetic maps [O'Brien, S. J.,et al., Nat. Genet.3:103, 1993]. The primer sets should cover a significant portion of the canine genome for the development of a linkage map. In order to determine how useful these primer sets would be for the other genome projects, we tested the 11 primer sets on the DNA from species representing five mammalian orders. Eighty-four percent of the gene-species combinations amplified successfully. We have named these primer sets “universal mammalian sequence-tagged sites” because they should be useful for many mammalian genome projects.

Key words

genome mappingevolutionhomologypolymerase chain reaction

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996